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Midterm

Political Science 1020E Study Guide - Midterm Guide: Decision Rule, Minimax, Positive Liberty

2 pages41 viewsWinter 2019

Department
Political Science
Course Code
Political Science 1020E
Professor
Charles Jones
Study Guide
Midterm

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Hobbes:
Main Ideas: State of Nature
His view: Defense of the State State of Nature is a State of War
His claims:
Humans seek felicity, and so, need power
Humans are predominantly self-interested, and equal in the sense that we are all
equally vulnerable and equally able
o Competition, Glory, Lack of Trust
Right of Nature Right of preservation
No reach of law, as there is no law to breach; Hobbes’ definition of injustice
Reason suggests convenient articles of Peace:
o Seek Peace, if you can get it
o Lay down your Natural Right, if other do so
o Perform your covenants
Locke: Most Influential philosopher
Main Idea: State of Nature
His View: Defense of the State State of Nature is a State of Peace
His claims:
Law of Nature is a moral claim; we are all the moral equals of one another
o Mankind is meant to be preserved as much as need be; a moralized license of
freedom
I am free to do what I have a right to do
EPLN each one of us possesses sovereign power, including right to punish and the right
to kill
State is needed to protect and enforce the EPLN of certain individuals and the interpret
the law of nature
Rousseau:
Main Ideas: State of Nature
His view: State as a Con
The human savage is intrinsically the moral superior to the civilized man
o The natural savage: Saugeen-Maitland theory
o Solidary, no language, no anticipation, fears only pain and hunger
Change comes about as humans have free will and the capacity to innovate
From scarcity to teamwork to leisure to downfall
Inequality leads to a state of war
Freidrich Hayak:
Main Ideas: Social Justice
His view: Social Justice is a Crock
Cannot be unjust due to actions, intentions, and agency
Agency can be unjust; actions can be unjust; but intentions cannot be said to be unjust
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