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Math Courses at Duke University

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Lauraanna Quinting

Duke University is a private research university in Durham, North Carolina. Duke is home to many famous alumni, including Canadian comedian Cody Ko. Duke offers a breadth of majors and courses for its students, including math courses. Here are 10 you should consider to check out.

1. MATH111 - Laboratory Calculus

If you are a more hands-on person this is the perfect class for you. It has a lab component where you will be put in groups to work on laboratory projects, and written reports. In the lecture, Professor Lewis Blake will instruct the students of topics in differentiation, transcendental functions, optimization, differential equations, numerical approximations, Euler's method, the Fundamental Theorem, separation of variables, slope fields, and mathematical modeling.

This course is not open to students who have credit for Mathematics 105L, 106L, or 121. The prerequisite of the course is an SAT score of at least 710 (680 if taken before Mar. 2016) or an ACT score of at least 30.

2. MATH112 - Laboratory Calculus II

examples of infinate series

This course is the second semester of introductory calculus with laboratory. Therefore it is still taught by Lewis Blake. You will be exposed to methods of integration, applications of integrals functions defined by integration, improper integrals, introduction to probability and distributions, infinite series and so much more.

This course is not open to students who have had Mathematics 122 or 122L. The prerequisite for the course is Mathematics 106L or 111L (AP/IPC/PMC placement credit for Math 21 is not sufficient if Math 122L is offered) or consent.

3. MATH216 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations

Properties of orthogonal matrices

Clark Bray is the professor of the course. Through this course, he covers systems of linear equations, matrix operations, and vector spaces. You will also be exposed to linear transformations, orthogonality, determinants, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Students will learn what diagonalization, linear differential equations, systems of differential equations with constant coefficients, applications, and computer simulations are.

This course is recommended primarily for engineering students. If you are in a different major such as a math major you are recommended to take Math 221 instead. The prerequisite for the class is Mathematics 202, 212 or 222.

4. MATH212 - Multivariable Calculus

Green's theorem in a formula

This course covers partial differentiation, multiple integrals, and topics in differential and integral vector calculus. Clark Bray will teach about Green's theorem, the divergence theorem, and Stokes's theorem.

This course is not open to students who have taken Mathematics 202 or 222. In order to register for the course, you must have taken Math 22, Math 112L, Math 122L, or Math 122.

5. MATH353 - Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations

This covers first and second-order ordinary differential equations with applications, You will be exposed to LaPlace transforms, series solutions and qualitative behavior, and Fourier series, You will also learn about partial differential equations, boundary value problems, and Sturm-Liouville theory.

This course is intended primarily for engineering and science students. The prerequisite before registering is completed Math 202, Math 212, or Math 222; 2)Math 216, Math 218, or Math 221. The professor for the course is Jeffrey Wong.

6. MATH230 - Probability

Central Limit Theorem Demonstration

This is a course that's also offered for graduate students. Taught by Sarah Schott, it covers probability models, random variables with discrete and continuous distributions. You will be taught on Independence, joint distributions, conditional distributions. You will also be taught on expectations, functions of random variables, and central limit theorem.

The prerequisite of the course is MATH 22, 112L, 122, 122L, 202, 212, 222. This course is NOT open to students who have credit for Mathematics 340.

7. MATH202 - Multivariable Calculus for Economics

math teacher at white board

This course covers Gaussian elimination, matrix algebra, determinants, linear independence. You will be taught on Calculus of several variables, chain rule, implicit differentiation. Students will be exposed to optimization, first-order conditions, and LaGrange multipliers.

The prerequisite of the course is Mathematics 22,122, 112L, or 122L. This course is not open to students who have taken Mathematics 222 or 212. The instructor of the course is Brian Fitzpatrick.

8. MATH218 - Matrices and Vector Spaces

math students in group photo

Professor Brian Fitzpatrick teaches topics of solving systems of linear equations, matrix factorizations and fundamental vector subspaces, and orthogonality in this course. Additionally you will learn about least-squares problems, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Students will also learn about singular value decomposition and principal component analysis, applications to data-driven problems.

This course is intended primarily for students in computer science and other data-focused sciences. Prospective math majors should take Mathematics 221 instead. The prerequisite for the course is first-semester calculus (Mathematics 21, 106L, 111L, 121, or equivalent).

9. MATH 361S - Mathematical Numerical Analysis

This course covers the development of numerical techniques for accurate, efficient solutions to problems in science, engineering, and mathematics through the use of computers. You will be taught on Linear systems, nonlinear equations, optimization, numerical integration, and differential equations. You will also learn about the simulation of dynamical systems, error analysis.

There is a research project and paper required. This course is not open to students who have had Computer Science 220 or 520. The prerequisites of the course are Mathematics 212 and 221 and basic knowledge of a programming language (at the level of Computer Science 101), or consent of instructor. Jeffrey Wong is the instructor.

10. MATH356 - Elementary Differential Equations

Duke Math Union Home

Professor Jeffrey Wong covers first and second-order differential equations with applications. You will be exposed to linear systems of differential equations. Students will be taught on Fourier series and applications to partial differential equations.

Additional topics include stability, nonlinear systems, bifurcations, or numerical methods. This course is not open to students who have had Mathematics 216 or Mathematics 353. The prerequisite of the course is Mathematics 218 or 221 and one of 202, 212, or 222.

Duke University is a great school that has many different math courses to choose from. The math courses vary from the standard math courses for general education to more advanced higher up courses. There are even math courses that are more tailored to your major such as math specific course for engineering and science students.

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