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Grade inflation use

Let’s be real, Northeastern is a tough school. Getting good grades and staying focused can be difficult – especially when there are so many people to meet and places to explore in Boston. But not to fear, here are three simple tips to get better grades.

1. Complete your assignments well in advance.

You’ll first notice that the overall quality of your work is better as you aren’t rushing to just put anything down on the paper the minute before it’s due. You will also have more time to look over your work to make sure you completed it to the best of your ability. Lastly, if there is anything you are unclear on, you have time to ask the teacher, TA, or a classmate for clarification.

2. Visit your TA or professor’s office hours.

If whoever is assigning grades for your course sees you put in the extra effort to seek help, chances are they will raise your grade. Educators at Northeastern WANT to see you do well. Whether it’s a few points, or 0.05% (which could honestly be the difference between two letter grades) anything helps.

3. Ask upperclassmen for past class materials.

Curricula for first and second year students at Northeastern is generally the same for the colleges within the university. For example, the majority of third year plus engineering students have taken up to diff eq for math and some combination of the general sciences (chemistry, physics, and biology) on campus. This means that they most likely have old material laying around or in storage; whether it be notes, homework, quizzes, and even past exams. Don’t hesitate to ask for it all. It’s simply more practice for you and hint hint: professors tend to model exams after past exams. This has the potential to save you a LOT of studying time as you’ll only study the topics you need to know, allowing you to go more in depth, or spend your time elsewhere.

Follow these tips, and hopefully your grades will rise! Best of luck to ya.


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Khiana

I'm a second year civil engineering student at Northeastern. I've learned a few tricks of the trade and want to share them to help you succeed!


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