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Math Courses at the University of California Irvine

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Kelly Solak
28 May 2020
10 min read

When it comes to life at school, especially college math, students can get pretty nervous about the difficulty of the classes. At the University of California, alma mater of Brenda Song, math courses are part of the graduation requirements, but the instructors are well educated and the courses are strategically placed in the schedules for students to do their best. Here are 10 math classes at the UC Irvine.

1. MATH 1A - Calculus

Student reviewing a math problem on the board.

MATH 1A is intended for majors in engineering and the physical sciences. It is a four credit class for students to take. Topics include an introduction to differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, with applications and an introduction to transcendental functions.

Prerequisites include three and one-half years of high school math, including trigonometry and analytic geometry. Students with high school exam credits (such as AP credit) should consider choosing a course more advanced than 1A.  A deficient grade in MATH 1A may be removed by taking MATH N1A.

2. MATH 10A - Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics, and Combinatorics

Student trying to solve a math problem on the board.

The sequence Math 10A, Math 10B is intended for majors in the life sciences. The class teaches students an introduction to differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, ordinary differential equations, and matrix algebra and systems of linear equations. It is four credits for students to take this course.

Prerequisites for MATH 10A are three and one-half years of high school math, including trigonometry and analytic geometry. Students who have not had calculus in high school are strongly advised to take the Student Learning Center's Math 98 adjunct course for Math 10A. Students will receive no credit for Mathematics 10A after completing Mathematics N10A.

3. MATH 16A - Analytic Geometry and Calculus

Student doing homework for mathematics.

Analytic Geometry and Calculus is supposed to be for majors in the life and social sciences. Topics covered in the course are derivatives, definite integrals and applications, maxima and minima, and applications of the exponential and logarithmic functions. This course is 3 credits for students to take.

Prerequisites include three years of high school math, including trigonometry. Students will receive no credit for 16A after taking N16A, 1A, or N1A. A deficient grade in Math 16A may be removed by taking Math N16A at the University of California.

4. MATH 53 - Multivariable Calculus

Math problems being solved on the board.

Multivariable Calculus covers parametric equations and polar coordinates. It also teaches vectors in 2- and 3-dimensional Euclidean spaces, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, vector calculus, Theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. The course is 4 credits for students at UC.

Mathematics 1B or N1B are prerequisites for this course. Students will receive no credit for Mathematics 53 after completing Mathematics N53 or W53; A failing grade in MATH 53 may be removed by completing Mathematics N53 or W53.

5. MATH 114 - Second Course in Abstract Algebra

Professor teaching students in class.

Second Course in Abstract Algebra teach topics on groups, rings, and fields not covered in Math 113. Possible topics in the course include the Sylow Theorems and their applications to group theory, classical groups, abelian groups and modules over a principal ideal domain. Units also include algebraic field extensions, splitting fields and Galois theory, construction and classification of finite fields.

Prerequisites for this course include 110 and 113, or consent of instructors. Second Course in Abstract Algebra is a 4 credit course. The class is 15 weeks long and has a 3 hour lecture per week. Students find this course fun and engaging!

6. MATH 121A - Mathematical Tools for the Physical Sciences

Professor working with student on the whiteboard.

MATH 121A is intended for students in the physical sciences who are not planning to take more advanced mathematics courses. A quick review of series and partial differentiation, complex variables and analytic functions. Other topics taught include integral transforms, and calculus of variations.

Prerequisites include Mathematics 53 and 54. Mathematical Tools for the Physical Sciences is 15 weeks long. It is also 3 hours of lecture per week for students to attend. The course is 4 credits for students at UC.

7. MATH 124 - Programming for Mathematical Applications

Professor reviewing with students in class.

This course is an introduction to computer programming with a focus on the solution of mathematical and scientific problems. Basic programming concepts such as variables, statements, loops, branches, functions, data types, and object orientation are taught to students. Mathematical/scientific tools such as arrays, floating point numbers, plotting, symbolic algebra, and various packages are also used.

Prerequisites for this course are  Math 53, 54, and 55. Programming for Mathematical Applications is 4 credits for students to fulfill. It is 15 weeks long and 3 hours of lecture. 1 hour of discussion per week is also required to pass this course.

8. MATH 136 - Incompleteness and Undecidability

Building on the University of California campus.

MATH 136 teaches functions computable by algorithm, Turing machines, and Church's thesis. Unsolvability of the halting problem, Rice's theorem, and recursively enumerable sets are also covered in depth for the class. Students find topics in this course difficult but professors are willing to break down the complexity of the problems.

Prerequisites for MATH 136 include Math 104 and 113 or consent of instructor. This course is 4 credits for students to complete. The course is 15 weeks and students are required to attend 3 hours of lecture per week.

9. MATH 198BC - Berkeley Connect

Student solving a math problem on the board.

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Throughout the semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate. However this is supposed to help guide students to see their interests, such as majoring in something to do with mathematics.

This course may be repeated with restriction from the university, and given credit each time. It is only 1 credit for students to fulfill, and very helpful in eliminating what students aren't interested in, especially careers in mathematics. The discussions are 1 hour a week.

10. MATH C218B - Probability Theory

Overview of UC campus.

The course is designed as a sequence with with Statistics C205A/Mathematics C218A. The course teaches the measure theory concepts needed for probability. Expection, distributions, Laws of large numbers and central limit theorems for independent random variables are also discussed.

The course can also be listed as STAT C205B. It is a four credit course for students to complete. It is 15 weeks long and 3 hours per week of lecture for students to fully complete the course.

UC logo image.

Mathematics courses vary depending on each university. At the University of California, there are fabulous courses that are organized in a way to help students reach their full learning potential and gain knowledge for future careers. Math is not something to get intimidated about when it is taught and understood by people who want the best for students!

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