Class Notes (1,100,000)
CA (620,000)
Brock U (10,000)
CHYS (1,000)
CHYS 1F90 (300)
Lecture 7

CHYS 1F90 Lecture Notes - Lecture 7: Kakuma, Treaty, Single Parent


Department
Child and Youth Studies
Course Code
CHYS 1F90
Professor
Shauna Pomerantz
Lecture
7

This preview shows page 1. to view the full 5 pages of the document.
CHYS 1F90: Introduction to Child and Youth Studies
Lecture 7 – Globalization, Rights, and Social Realities
Wednesday, February 24th, 2016
**What Does it Mean to be in the Top 1%?**
Beyond “West is Best”
How do we talk about / help children in the global south without “Othering” them?
Respect for culture, history, and economy
Acknowledge local knowledge
Focus on resilience not victimization
Do not assume that we have all of the knowledge
Our perspectives are not the only ones in the world
Resilience
The Bigger Picture
Children’s lives shaped by global, economic, and political contexts:
Trade
War
Law
Rights
Education
Poverty
Work
Food and water
Health
Children seek to act back, they are political and have desires
Globalization
Ongoing process
Historical era with technology, economy, and production speeding up globalization
Interconnection of global society:
Integration of world’s markets, people, governments
Driven by trade, investment, money
Farther, faster, cheaper
Economic Context
Investments/trade:
Global economy
Trade de-regulation
Rich nations exploiting poor
Economic imperialism/inequality
The more things you have and the less you pay for it, the higher the mark up and the more money can be
made
Technological Context
Digital age:
Internet/email
Cell phone/texting
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat
Electronic banking
Technological revolution
Social Context
Profits not people:
Multinational corps
Cheap, part-time, replaceable labour
“Travelling lives”
Child labour
Migration for work
Pros For Young People
Shrinking world:
World awareness
Global belonging
Anyone can succeed (?)
American dream (?)
“Twitter Revolution”
E-protests:
Social media as power
Mobilization
Global youth movements
Raising your voice
Occupy Wall Street
We the 99% (2011):
Youth at the forefront
Against unjust distribution of wealth
Corporate power over government
Wealthiest 1% seen as too powerful and unaccountable
Activism
Cons For Young People
Eroding safety net:
Clinics, shelters, schools, programs
Welfare/EI cuts
Increase in parent frustration
Increase in crime
Increase in arrests
Increase in distrust
Local Marginalization
Decreased safety nets = rise in street youth:
No jobs/support
No shelters
Rise in informal work (panhandling, flying a sign, squeegeeing)
Treated as menace
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version