Class Notes (786,786)
Canada (482,282)
Brock University (11,655)
English (462)
ENGL 1F95 (75)
Lecture 2

LECTURE 2 + SEM 1.docx

3 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

School
Brock University
Department
English
Course
ENGL 1F95
Professor
Tim Conley
Semester
Fall

Description
LECTURE #2 + SEM #1 September 11, 2013 Metaphor: a comparison                                                              Caesura: punctuated pause in the middle of a  line Simile: comparison using "like" or "as"                                              End­stop: punctuation that makes you  pause (opposite of enjambment) Cliché: metaphors that have gone stale/ overused                             Copula: attaches two things or ideas Metonym: stands for something else/ no comparison    / William Carlos Williams described poems as "Machines made out of words." / Emerson: "Language is fossilized poetry." A Red, Red Rose O, my luve's like a red, red rose That's newly sprung in June. O, my luve is like the melodie That's sweetly played in tune.   As fair art thou, my bonnie lass, So deep in luve am I; And I will luve thee still, my dear, Till the seas gang dry.   Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear, And the rocks melt wi' the sun; And I will luve thee still, my dear, While the sands o' life shall run.   And fare thee weel, my only luve, And fare thee weel a while! And I will come again, my luve, Though it were ten thousand mile . • Robert Burns, 1796 (pg. 808) • Scottish poet ­ speaking to his own people about his personal feelings • Soft, romantic language ("sweetly" "dear" "luve" "lass") • Declaration of love:  • "red" ­ colour of passion, love • "rose"  ­ flower of love, affection • "gang" ­ means "go" The Flea Mark but this flea, and mark in this How little that which thou deny'st me is; It sucked me first, and now sucks thee, And in this flea our two bloods mingled be; Thou know'st that this cannot be said A sin, nor shame, nor loss of maidenhead    Yet this enjoys before it woo,    And pampered swells with one blood made of two,    And this, alas, is more than we would do.  Oh stay, three lives in one flea spare, Where we almost, yea more than, married are. This flea is you and I, and this Our marriage bed, and marriage temple is; Though parents grudge, and you, we're met And cloistered in these living walls of jet.    Though use make you apt to kill me,    Let not to that, self­murder added be,    And sacrilege, three sins in killing three.   Cruel and sudden, hast thou since Purpled thy nail in blood of innocence? Wherein could this flea guilty be, Except in that drop which it sucked from thee? Yet thou triumph'st, and say'st that thou Find'st not thyself, nor me, the weaker now;    'Tis true; then learn how false, fears be;    Just so much honor, when thou yield'st to me;    Will waste, as this flea's death took life from thee. • John Donne, 1633 (pg. 738)  •
More Less

Related notes for ENGL 1F95

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit