Class Notes (838,386)
Canada (510,872)
Brock University (12,137)
KINE 1P90 (106)
Lecture

Lecture2&3- PEKN 1P90

10 Pages
97 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Physical Education and Kinesiology
Course
KINE 1P90
Professor
Nota Klentrou
Semester
Winter

Description
Skeletal Muscle Structure/ Function Lecture 2­ January 13  & 15  2014 Functions of Muscle Locomotion  Stability: posture/resist gravity  Communication: facial expression, writing, speaking etc. Control of body openings: sphincter muscles  Heat production shivering (chemical ▯ mechanical energy ▯ heat) General “Gross” Anatomy of a Muscle  Terminology: Origin muscle attachment to the bone at the stationary end (head) tends to be ore proximal  Insertion Bony attachment at the more mobile end (usually) Tends to be more distal  Belly Thicker middle region of the muscle  Prime mover (agonist) Muscle that produces most of the force for a given movement Ex; biceps Antagonist muscles Muscles that produce opposite movement Ex; triceps  Synergistic muscles Muscles that work together to produce the same movement  Ex; core movements Microscopic structure: Connective tissue Muscle composed of muscle tissue and connective tissue Multiple layers of connective tissue  Thick connective tissue around entire muscles  Fascia: most external  Extension of tendonous tissue Superficial muscle from skin  Separates muscle form skin Deep  Hold muscles of similar functions together  3 types of connective tissue – extensions of deep fascia  1. Epimysium: sits on muscle, layer of connective tissue around entire muscles – deep to superficial  fascia, “epi­“ means on top  2. Perimysium “around”: connective tissue covering that surrounds a “bundle of muscle fibers”  (muscle cells) 3. Endomysium “in”: surrounds each muscle fiber (cell), thin, capillaries and nerves run along  surface  Blood vessels in skeletal muscle  Capillaries surrounds the muscle fibers Supply fibers with blood; micro­circulation Exercise, long time training, endurance increases # of capillaries Very vascular Adaptable  Sarcoplasmic reticulum: surrounds the myofibrils; calcium storage  Microscopic Organization Inside the muscle cell (fiber) Myofibrils  Specialized arrangements of contractile proteins   Sarcolemma  Cell membrane  Mitochondria (energy production) Either between fibrils (intermyofibrillar) Or right under the cell membrane (subsarcolemmal)  T­tubules (communication that produce muscle contraction) continuous with cell membrane or sarcolemma  Sarcoplasmic reticulum  Membrane network Ca2+ storage Terminal cisternae Sarcoplasm  Myoglobin: protein that looks like hemoglobin and responsible for binding oxygen within muscle  fiber Glycogen: store this inside the muscle, need it to have fuel to initiate movement (glycogen  depletion: muscle cant move, no more glycogen left)  IMTG’s  Intramuscular triglycerides: also stored in muscle fiber, may be needed to initiate movement  Satellite cells: communication  Sarcomere: arrangement of the fibers, connects the z­disc, muscle grows by adding more  sarcomeres width­Side length­ length more protein  Myofilaments  Sarcomere Z­disc to z­disc Contractile unit of muscle  A­Band Anisotropic (dark) band  Thick filaments I­Band Isotropic (light) band  H­Band (zone) Lighter band in middle of a­band Only visible during rest  know form the outside in Myofilaments Thick filament  Made of myosin molecules stacked together  Composed of several hundred myosin subunits A­Band  Myosin (protein) 15nm in diameter “golf club like shape” specialized shape/function head only participates in contraction  A­Band is where the tops connect  Thin Filament 3 protein (actin (red balls), tropomyosin (long white), troponin complex) 7 nm in diameter G actin (globular) Active site (connected to myosin head during contraction) bridge (connection), powerstroke is  different  G is covered during relaxation, expose G during movement/contraction F actin (fibrous) Woven chain  Tropomyosin  Blocks active site on G actin  Sit on g actin because it is blocked by troponin Troponin Ca2+ binding site  Elastic filaments Hold myosin proteins to the z­disc Titan – protein  Connects to z­disc  Helps keep other filaments organized  Resists stretch Recoil  Diagram on sakai skeletal muscle organization  Filaments – exam  A Sarcomere In between z­lines/disc Contraction: Shortening of the sarcomeres  Thousands of sarcomeres shortening (actin sliding over myosin) Filament sliding theory Actin and Myosin Actin and myosin are often called contractile proteins, neither actually contracts Actin and myosin are not unique to muscle cells, but are more abundant and more highly
More Less

Related notes for KINE 1P90

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit