Class Notes (836,147)
Canada (509,656)
Brock University (12,091)
POLI 2P93 (9)
Lecture

Wednesday January 22nd 2014 Poli 2p93.docx

8 Pages
163 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLI 2P93
Professor
Jason Sykes
Semester
Winter

Description
Wednesday January 22  2014d Poli 2P93: John Locke, The Ideal State  From the Second Treatise of government John Locke: ­ born in England in 1632  ­ father wasn’t poor nor rich  o attorney and land owner ­ did his bachelor of arts at oxford  ­ Became a really good friend of Newton  ­ Had a strong protestant  ­ Struggle in England for those who were advocates and those who thought people  should be in power  ­ Compared to Hobbes Quote 1: On the State of nature  ­ “the state that all men are naturally in, and that is a state of perfect freedom to  order their actions and dispose of their possessions and persons as they think fit,  within the bounds of the law of nature” ­ property predates society  ­ we are always bound by the laws of nature  2: Natural Equality  ­ “equality, wherein all the power and jurisdiction is reciprocal, no one having more  than another… unless the lord and master … set one above the another, and  confer on him by an evident and clear appointment an undoubted right to  domination and sovereignty” ­ power of many and the state of nature is equal  3: Liberty, Not License ­ “though this be a state of state liberty, it is not a state of license; though man in  that state have an uncontrollable liberty to dispose of his persons or possessions,  yet he has not liberty to destroy himself, or so mych as any creature in his  possession, but where some nobler use than it bare preservation calls for it” ­ restrictions in the state of nature  ­ man cannot destroy himself ­ no civil authority exists  ­ not a state without morality  ­ pre­political but not pre­moral (Primary distinction between Hobbes and Locke) 4: Order in Nature ­ “the state of nature has a law of nature to govern it, which obliges everyone, and  reason which is that law … being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm  another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions” ­ this is where their theories depart  ­ Hobbes says if you don’t want to get killed don’t kill others  5: God’s Possesions ­ “for men being all the workmanship of one omnipotent and infinitely wise maker,  all the servants of one sovereign Master, sent into world by His order, and about  His business” ­ god is the power  ­ god has intentions and purpose to his actions  ­ god plays a center role in his thinking ­ “they are His property, whose workmanship they are, made to last during His, not  one another’s pleasure”  ­ create a loop on his thoughts about property  o how we cannot hurt ourselves  o has implications for society  6: Natural Law ­ “there cannot be supposed any such subordinate among us, that may authorize us  to destroy one another, as if we were made for one another’s uses, as the inferior  ranks of creatures are for ours” ­ if the world was made for use we are made to use it  ­ foundation that mans rights should be limited  ­ we are the property of god  ­ god tells us what to do  ­ state of nature is not a state of war  7: Natural Law ­ everyone … is bound to preserve himself… by the like reason when his own  preservation comes not in competition, ought he, as much as he can, to preserve  the rest of mankind, and not, unless it be to do justice on an offender, take away or  impair the life, or what tends to the preservation of the life, the liberty, health,  limb or goods of another ­ we cannot kill ourselves  ­ must also preserve the rest of man kind ­ we are here to do gods work ­ duty to rescue laws – in quebec you must call to aid unless there is harm to  oneself or a third party  ­ it is okay to do those things to an offender  8: Natural Law ­ “ in the state of nature, all men may be restrained from invading other’s rights… everyone has a right to punish the transgressor of that law to such a degree as  many hinder its violation” ­ like in Canada ­ you can also do this with property  ­ keeps all men equal but subject to the laws of nature  9: Natural law and Punishment ­ “man has the power over the criminal, “but yet no absolute or arbitrary power…  according to the passionate heats or boundless extravagance of his own will; but  only reattribute to him so far as calm reason and conscience dictate what is  propitiate to his transgression, which is so much as may serve for reparation and  restraint” ­ ban cruel and unfair punishment   10: Violation of  Natural Law  ­ “declare himself to live by another rule than that of common reson and equity …  becomes dangerous to mankind” ­ “being a trespass against the whole species and the peace and safety of it … every  man .. by the right he hath to preserve mankind in general, may restrain or where  ne ­ you justice is a threat to society ­ society has a right to punish you  11: Retaining the right to reparation – civil law ­ “he who hath received any damages, has, besides the right of punishment  common to him with other men, a particular right to seek reparation for him that  has done it… any other person … may … assist him in recovering from the  offender so much as may make satisfaction for the harm” ­ we also have the right to reparations ­ beginning of civil law  ­ authority can remit punishment  12: Neutral Justice Needed – Civil society  ­ “ I doubt not but it will be objected that it is unreasonable for men to be judges in  their own cases … partial to themselves and their friends … ill nature, passion,  and revenge … carry them too far in punishing others” ­ still has a basis of our own order  ­ conflict of interests  13: Entering social compact through god’s will ­ hence nothing but confusion and disorder will follow; and that therefore god hath  certainly appointed government to restrain the partiality and violence of men” ­ justification for society ­ society’s a creation of god 14: On Property ­ “natural reason… tells us that men… have a right to their preservation and  consequently to meat and drink… revelation …. An account of those grants God  made of the world… to mankind in common … it seems to some a very great  difficulty how anyone should be able to say any of that property is theirs” ­ a commentary on hobbes  15: On Property ­ I shall endeacor to show how men might come 2 have a property in several parts  of that which God gave to mankind in common, and that without any express  compact of all the commoners” ­ You don’t need society to say that it is yours  ­ “god hath given the world to men in common … also given them reason to make  use of it to the best advantage of life and convenience … for the support and  comfort of their being  ­ to improve life ­ “this belongs to “mankind in common  ­ all in common but given to mankind to make use of  16:  ­ “yet being given for the use of men, there must be of necessity be a means to  approrpate them some way or other before they can be of any use or at all  beneficial to any particular man… fruit or venison nourishes the wild indian …  still a tenant in common … must be his; and so his, i.e A part of him , that another  can no longer have any right to it, before it can do any good for the support of his  life ­ it is a part of someone ­ for something be useful it must become ours  ­ it is a critical move for Locke  17: On Property  ­ “(though everything else is in common)… every man has a property in his own  person; this n
More Less

Related notes for POLI 2P93

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit