Class Notes (835,007)
Canada (508,866)
Brock University (12,083)
POLI 2P93 (9)
Lecture

Wednesday February 26th 2014 2p93.docx

7 Pages
61 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLI 2P93
Professor
Jason Sykes
Semester
Winter

Description
Wednesday February 26  2014th Poli 2p93: John Stuart Mill  Freedom of Speech  Slide 1: “no argument… can now be needed against permitting a legislature or an executive, not  identified in the interest with the people, to prescribed opinions to them, and determine  what doctrines or what arguments they shall be allowed to hear” Slide 2: ­ “let us suppose…that government is entirely at one with the people and never  thinks of exerting any poer of coercion unless in agreement with what it conceives  to be their voice ­ what if they are only doing what we are doing  Slide 3: ­ there is no question  ­ defendant of freedom of speech ­ “I deny the right of the people to exercise such coercion, either by themselves or  by their gov’t. The power itself is illegitimate. The best government has no more  title to it than the worst ­ doesn’t mater who controls it Slide 4: ­ if all of mankind minus one were of one opinion manking would be no more  justified in silenceing that one person than he, if he had the power, would be  justified in silencing mankind ­ what is hate speech ­ whether things are okay or not okay  ­ freedom of speech advocates 5: ­ the evil of silencing the expression of an opinion is that it is robbing the human  race, posterity as well as the existing generation those who dissent from the  opinion still more than those who hold it ­ taking opinion that they don’t agree with away from them  ­ you would think it would harm the person they are silencing  ­ the person who is doing the scilencing is hurt the most  6: ­ if the opinon is right they are deprived of the opp of exchanging error for truth  ­ we will be stuck with the wrong thinking  ­ the exposure of the truths that we progress ­ there are things we know that are true  7: ­ if wrong they lose, what is almost as great a benefit, the clearer perception and  livelier impression of truth produced by its collision with error  ­ we become more sure of our truths when we are exposed to counter opinions  8: ­ those who desire to suppress it of course deny its truth but are not infallible  ­ all silencing  of discussion is an assumption of infallibility  ­ chance we are wrong ­ if you are wrong you cannot silence anyone else’s opinion  9: ­ while everyone well knows himself to be fallible few think it is necessary to take  any precautions against their own fallibility or admit the supposition that any  opinion which they feel very certain may be one of the examples ­ those are the ones we hold most accountable and most certain  ­ we value the correctness of them the most 10: ­ there is no such thing as absolute certainty, but there is assurance sufficient for the  purposes of human life ­ we may and must, assume our opinion to be true for the guidance of our own  conduct and it is assuming no more when we forbid bad men to pervert society by  the propagation of opinions  ­ we would be capable of almost nothing, walk out the door and assume you can  breathe but you don’t know  ­ if we thought about everything we would be paralyzed  11: ­ “difference between presuming an opinion to be true because with every  opportunity for contesting it, it has not been refuted and assuming it’s the truth for  the purpose of not permitting its refutation  ­ arguing the truth  ­ be more sure of your own opinion  12: ­ complete liberty of contradicting and disproving our opinion is the very condition  which justifies us in assuming its truth for the purposes of action  ­ if you don’t face scrutiny you cannot grow from things  ­ no justification to act  13: ­ we ought to be moved by the consideration that, however true it may be, if it is  not full frequently and fearlessly discussed it will be held as a dead dogma not a  living truth  ­ men and women using their mental faculties  14: ­ if the cultivation of the understanding consists in one thing more than another it is  surely in learning the grounds of one’s own opinions  ­ its not enough that you hold an opinion you have to understand an opinion  ­ you are not told why you have to do things  ­ what the alternative opinions are 15: not only the ground of the opinion are forgotten in the absence of discussion but too often  the meaning of the opinion itself  ­ you could say something that happened  ­ we forget the reason why we have rights and opinions 16: ­ instead of being one true and the other false, share the truth between them, and the  nonconforming opinions is needed to supply the remainder of the truth  ­ every opinion which embodies somewhat of the portion of truth which the  common opinion omits ought to be considered precious  17: Four Rules for Freedom of Speech  ­ 1: any opinions silenced may be true – we are fallible  ­ 2: silenced opinions, even wrong, may contain some truth  ­ 3: without challenge even correct opinions are held in prejudice without  understanding  ­ 4: the meaning of correct opinion will be lost, become dogma, lose convection  John Stuart Mill: Utilitarianism  1:  ­ utility or the greatest happiness principles holds that actions are right in  proportions as they tend to promote happiness wrong as they tend to produce  ­ happiness is pleasure  ­ or the absence of pain  ­ unhappiness is pain/absence of pleasure  ­ sounds like hobbes  2: ­ pleasure and freedom from pain are the only things desirable as ends and that all  desirable things… are either for the pleasure inherent in themselves or as a means  to the promotion of pleasure  ­ I want things for happiness 3:  ­ what makes a pleasure better than another? ­ If there be one to which all or almost all who have experience of both give a  decided preference, irrespective of any feeling of moral obligaton to prefer it that  is the more desirable please ­ There are superior pleasures  ­ If you are comparing 2 pleasures we wouldn’t give up the better pleasure  4: ­ so what will we choose? ­ Those who 
More Less

Related notes for POLI 2P93

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit