Class Notes (1,000,000)
CA (610,000)
Brock U (10,000)
POLI (500)
Lecture 25

POLI 2F12 Lecture Notes - Lecture 25: Charlottetown Accord, Plurality Voting System, New Approach


Department
Political Science
Course Code
POLI 2F12
Professor
Jason Sykes
Lecture
25

This preview shows half of the first page. to view the full 2 pages of the document.
POLI 2F12 Sec 01
January 15, 2016
Charlottetown Accord
-Address other problems outside of Quebec
-Meech Lake was to elitist
-Gives
-Reform way we choose supreme court justices
-Gives more seats in House of Commons to Quebec and Ontario
(Quebec gets 25% of the seats no matter what)
-Reasonable access to housing, food and post secondary
-Etc.
-3 provinces said they were going to have a provincial referendum
-Federal government decided (more or less had their hands tied) to have a
national referendum
-Why it failed
-Too much power to Quebec (concern of English speaking population)
-Aboriginals felt this would constrain self government
-Native women felt this accord would give native men too much power
-Gays and Lesbians felt excluded
-Women’s groups had issues
-Provinces cutting social services
The National Unity Crisis and A New Approach to Quebec Nationalism
-Quebec holds another referendum on sovereignty in 1995
-Liberal PM asked Quebeckers to vote “no” to independence, promising
change
-After narrow defeat of referendum (50.6% NO and 49.4% YES), federal
government pursues non-constitutional measures to defuse Quebec
nationalism
-House of Commons set out statement that recognizes Quebec is
di?erent (1996)
-Constitutional Amendment Act
-How to go about changing the constitution
-Needed approval of Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, 2 of the 4
Atlantic provinces and 2 western provinces (Alberta and
Saskatchewan or Manitoba) to make parliamentary change to
constitution
-Not a full constitutional law, could be revoted on at any time
-Federal government has less involvement with citizens
-Social housing
-Labour
-Mining
-Forestry
-Resources
-All these have been give to provincial power
-Clarity Act
-Sets out terms a province must satisfy to secede from Canada
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version