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Lecture 1

PSYC 2P12 Lecture Notes - Lecture 1: Dementia, Cognitive Reserve


Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYC 2P12
Professor
Cathy Mondloch
Lecture
1

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THE AGING PROCESS
LONGEVITY
- Average expected life span
- the number of years lived by the average person
- factors have lead to an increase
- ancient Rome: 25 yes
- north America 1900: 47 years
- Canada 2005: 81 years
- Factors: infant mortality rate, health care, nutrition, violence
- The gap between men and women life expectancy is decreasing
HOW LONG ARE YOU LIKELY TO LIVE?
- genetic
- diet
- life style choices
- SES; stress, diet, education
HOW LONG CAN WE LIVE?
• lifespan: the oldest age to which any person can live
CAN WE CHANGE MAXIMUM LIFESPAN?
• many believe unlikely; no current proven anti-aging remedy
• focus on extending “useful life expectancy”; low calorie diets conserve energy
STAGES IN LATE ADULTHOOD
- young old: the “third” age; 60/65- 80; more active; better health
- old old: the “fourth age”; over 80 years; spend more time ill, less able to live
independently
THE YOUNG OLD
- report good life satisfaction
- adapt to primary again; revising goals; relying on cultural supports
- good chance of fitness and personal well being
OLD OLD
- many are functioning relatively well
- many others:
•sizeable loss in abilities
•dementia
•decreased quality of life
•loss of dignity
WHAT IS IS LIKE TO BE OLD?
- experiencing discrimination
- integertiy vs. despair
- social relationships
- sensory motor changes
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