Class Notes (837,539)
Canada (510,303)
Brock University (12,132)
Psychology (853)
PSYC 2P20 (23)
Lecture

Notes

8 Pages
120 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 2P20
Professor
Gillian Dale
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC 2P20: January 28, 2014 ATTENTION *Paraphippocampal Place Area (PPA) similar to FFA but for “places,” includes houses  and also imagined structures, may actual process “context” rather than “place”  th Tuesday Feb 11 , Midterm Exam  Bring student card  11 true/ false  1 mandatory short answer  8 short answer questions  Covers all material from beginning to next week’s lecture/ labs  All reading “fair game,” but focus on big concepts  Material from book NOT covered in lecture still eligible but only things that are  discussed in detail  All lab material and assigned articles testable (and likely)  Attention  What is attention?  Models of Selective Attention o Early selection o Late selection o Alternative models  • Change blindness/ inattention blindness What is Attention? • “Everyone knows what attention is. It is the taking possession by the mind, in  clear and vivid form, of one out of what seem several simultaneously possible  objects or trains of thought. Focalization, concentration, of consciousness are of  its essence. It implies withdrawal from some things in order to deal effectively  with others” – William James • Ex. Message selection  ▯both messages are in our attention, but we have the  capacity to selectively attend to the colored words and ignore the irrelevant words What is Attention, revised. • The selection of, orienting to, or the processing of a stimulus for conscious  control of behavior o Does not imply that focus has to be on a specific thing o Does not imply that it is under our conscious control, or that we are  conscious of it  • Focused (ex. reading a book) vs. Divided (ex. listening in lecture, writing notes,  texting) o Selective attention or distraction multitasking  • Overt (ex. having a direct conversation w/ someone) vs. Covert (peripheral, ex.  mother w/ child at park may be doing something else but still is aware of where  her child is) • Automatic (ex. Stroop, automatic attention to words and meaning) vs. Controlled  o Attention can be controlled by you (controlled) or your environment  (automatic) • Inhibition (suppression of things that you don’t want to pay attention to, ex.  tuning out people chatting in lecture) vs. Activation (activating something in  environment and bringing into awareness) • Parallel (simultaneously) vs. Serial (serially or individually)  What is Attention? • Top Down o Different from object recognition o Blanket term for cognitive processes that are under control; efforts and  goals, experience allow us to direct attention to certain stimuli o Endogenous (coming from within) o Conscious control o Effortful o Ex. driving • Bottom Up o No control over this type of attention; driven by the stimulus itself o Exogenous (coming from without) o Automatic o Reflexive  o Ex. loud noise Attentional Filter • Not everything we perceive receives attention; it would be inefficient for our  brains to processes everything in the environment, and it would also be difficult to  live this way • Some stimuli are elaborated (this can be consciously controlled or automatic),  while others are reduced/ignored • On what basis do we select relevant stimuli? • How much processing occurs before attention filters our irrelevant items? Why can’t we just attend to everything? • Attentional Bottleneck o For initial perceptual representation (perceiving info from environment  and making initial representation), resources are unlimited (i.e., parallel) o At this stage we are processing objects and features in a parallel fashion o For deep processing (conscious attention), the process is limited (i.e.,  serial)  o Thus, bottleneck develops o This is why it is difficult to attend to multiple things at the same time Models of Selective Attention • Early Selection: Attentional selection of relevant information occurs early, and is  based on simple perceptual information only • Late Selection: Attentional selection occurs later, and is based on perceptual  information AND semantic (meaning) information  Early Experiments • Cherry (153)  ▯ Dichotic Listening Paradigm o 2 messages presented, with one in each ear o Examine how well participant can shadow message in one ear  i.e., Attend to information in one ear, and suppress informational  from other ear  o It is very difficult, if not impossible, for participants to recall the message  from the “ignored” ear (i.e., the content) o However, they are able to recognize physical characteristics of suppressed  message   Volume (ex. could detect if there was a sudden increase in volume)  Pitch (ex. could detect if the voice changed pitch)  Pacing (ex. could detect if message sped up or slowed down) • Dichotic Listening: o CAN report volume, pitch, pacing o CANNOT report content (semantics), language or whether the message  was forwards/backwards • Evidence for early selection  o i.e., Do not process to the level of meaning before we decide to elaborate  the stimuli (bring into full attention)  Broadbent’s (1958) Filter Theory • Early Selection Model • Sensory perception  ▯sense stimuli in environment  • Perceptual processing  ▯physical characteristics are extracted from everything • Filter  ▯attention filters out things that are unnecessary  • Semantic processing  ▯filtered for meaning  • Limited capacity processor  ▯elaborates the information and b
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 2P20

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit