Class Notes (835,730)
Canada (509,354)
Brock University (12,091)
Psychology (853)
PSYC 3F20 (55)
Lecture

Feb 3

5 Pages
95 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 3F20
Professor
Andrew Dane
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC 3F20: February 3, 2013 Obsessive Compulsive Disorder A. DSM­5 CriteriaPresence of obsessions, compulsions or both:   Obsessions defined by (1) or (2) 1. Recurrent and persistent thoughts, impulses, or images that are experienced, at some  time during the disturbance, as intrusive and inappropriate and that cause marked anxiety  or distress   The thoughts, impulses, or images are not simply excessive worries about  real­life problems  2. The individual attempts to ignore or suppress such thoughts, impulses, or images or to  neutralize them with some other thought or action   The person recognizes that the obsessional thoughts, impulses, or images  are a product of his or her own mind Obsessions  Obsessions:  Most frequent obsessions are the following:  Contamination  (55%); aggressive impulses (50%); sexual content  (35%); need for order(37%)  Normal to have intrusive thoughts, but they become a clinical problem  when they are distressing and hard to suppress  Compulsions: DSM­5 Criteria  Compulsions are defined by 1 and 2:  1. The person has repetitive behaviors (eg, hand washing, ordering, checking) or mental  acts (eg, praying, counting, repeating words silently) that the person feels driven to  perform in response to an obsession or according to rules that must be applied rigidly  2. The behaviors or mental acts are aimed at preventing some dreaded event or situation;  however, these behaviors or mental acts either are not connected in a realistic way with  what they are designed to neutralize or prevent, or are clearly excessive.  Compulsions • Most common compulsions include checking, ordering and arranging, washing  and cleaning • Obsessions with contamination frequently lead to washing rituals • Aggression and sexual obsessions are often associated with checking rituals Other Diagnostic Criteria for OCD • Time consuming (more than one hours per day), or cause clinically significant  distress or impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of  functioning • Specify if: o With good or fair insight o With poor insight o With absent insight/ delusional  Howard Hughes: OCD • Hughes used tissues to pick up objects, so that he could protect himself from  germs • If not noticed dust, stains or other imperfections on people’s clothes, he would  demand they fix or clean it Etiology of OCD: Intrusive Thoughts • Normal to have intrusive thoughts, especially in response to stressful life events • Individuals with OCD differ from non­anxious individuals in that they become  anxiously apprehensive about the intrusive thought Barlow, Durand & Stewart Etiological Model Etiology: Overview • Why do some people have more intrusive thoughts, become anxious about them,  and then need to suppress them with compulsions? o Generalized Biological Vulnerability  Genetic research  Corticostriatal Pathophysiological Model o General Psychological Vulnerability  Personality o Specific Psychological Vulnerability  Thought­action fusion; inflated responsibility; catastrophization o Social Factors  Attachment  OCD and Genetic Factors • OCD risk is 3 to 12 times higher in first degree relative than in general population • OCD concordance 80­87% in MZ twins vs. 47.50% in DZ twins OCD and fMRI: Symptom Provocation • Aversive vs. Neutral stimuli • See if there is a difference in brain activity OCD and fMRI: Symptom Provocation • Hyperactivity in orbitofrontal cortex, ACC, basal ganglia (striatum), and thalamus  relative to healthy control participants in response to OCD­relevant vs. neutral  cues Corticostriatal Pathophysiological Model • Implicit information processing deficits due to dysfunctional striatum (basal  ganglia) • Striatum evaluates salience of sensory info (ex. rewarding, new?) • Inefficient gating sensory information relayed by the thalamus o Ex. everything is processed • Leads to hyperactivity in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) • Hyperactivity of OFC associated with intrusive thoughts • Perception of reward and punishment cues abnormal • People with OCD nearly always have a sense of committing an error • Hyperactivity in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) • Hyperactivity of ACC associated with non­specific anxiety o Problem with error checking (although, not actually making errors any  more than a normal population) Generalized Psychological Vulnerability: Personality • Several studies have shown that compared to control participants, individuals with  OCD were higher in neuroticism (emotionally reactive) an
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 3F20

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit