Class Notes (835,730)
Canada (509,354)
Brock University (12,091)
Psychology (853)
PSYC 3F20 (55)
Lecture

Feb 10

5 Pages
126 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 3F20
Professor
Andrew Dane
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC 3F20: February 10, 2014 Depressive Disorders • Major Depressive Disorder • Persistent Depressive Disorder (Dysthymia) • Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder Major Depressive Disorder 1. Depressed mood most of the day, nearly every day  How do you define a depressed mood? (sad, logged, irritable, tearful,  empty, persistent bad feeling) 2. Markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities most of  the day, nearly every day (anhedonia)  3. Significant weight loss when not dieting or weight gain, or decrease or increase in  appetite nearly every day. 4. Insomnia or hypersomnia nearly every day 5. Psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day (inability to sit still, restless  ­­­ slowed speech, thinking, body movements)  6. Fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day 7. Feelings of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt nearly every day  (misinterpret everyday or trivial events as personal defects, exaggerated sense of  responsibility, rumination) 8. Diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness, nearly every day 9. Recurrent thoughts of death, recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or  a suicide attempt or a specific plan for committing suicide Major Depressive Disorder • 5 of 9 symptoms, with at least one of the two being depressed mood or loss of  interest or pleasure in activities (anhedonia) • Symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social,  occupational, or other important areas of functioning • Present for at least a two­week period Differential Diagnosis: Sadness • How is MDD different from normal sadness? • To be considered depression the following must be present: o Severity: 5 of 9 symptoms o Duration: most of day, nearly every day for at least two weeks o Clinically significant distress and impairment  Differential Diagnosis: Grief • Depressive symptoms experienced by approximately 62% of people following the  death of a loved one o Is this a normal reaction or a depressive episode? • DSM­5 eliminated the DSM­IV stipulation that the symptoms are not better  accounted for by bereavement o Why?  Bereavement is a severe stressor that can trigger depression soon  after the loss in a vulnerable individual  Grief typically lasts 1­2 years rather than two months  Replaced bereavement criterion with a detail footnote about how to  distinguish normal grief from MDD MDD: Developmental Course and Prevalence   Mean age of onset for MDD is 25 years  Average duration of depressive episode is 6 to 9 months, 90% rate of remission  within 5 years  50% have subsequent depressive episodes (tends to be cyclical)   5% lifetime prevalence; prevalence for women double that Persistent Depressive Disorder (Dysthymia)  A. Depressed mood that persists for most of the day, for more days than not, for at  least two years  B. Two of six symptoms (appetite low, insomnia, low energy, low self­esteem,  poor concentration, feelings of hopelessness)  Never been without symptoms in A and B for more than two months over two­ year periods  In summary, less severe but more chronic symptoms than MDD Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder  A. In the majority of the menstrual cycles, at least 5 symptoms must be 
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 3F20

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit