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Lecture 12

WGST 1F90 Lecture Notes - Lecture 12: Queer Theory, Feminist Theory, Underfunded


Department
Women's and Gender Studies
Course Code
WGST 1F90
Professor
Jenny Janke
Lecture
12

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Intro to Women and Gender Studies WGST 1F90
Week 12
1
Concepts
Personal sexism
Rape culture
Gender
Cisgender
Meritocracy
The Materiality of Oppression
Social Justice
Equity
Theory
Liberal feminist theory
Radical feminist theory
Marxist feminist theory
Social feminist theory
Queer theory
Anti-racist theory
Reece Witherspoon
What do we do now?”
Ridiculous that a woman wouldnt know what to do.
If you want something done honey, do it yourself.
Started a Publishing and movie producing company Pacific Standard.
o Gone Girl & Wild.
Focuses on “real women.
Films with women at the centre are not a Public Service Project.
19 % of congress are women too low.
o Public access to childcare.
o Underfunded healthcare.
o Need equal representation.
Lecture
Key Terms
Three central life-shaping processes
Time Crunch (Gazzo, 2010)
Labour force segregation
Instrumental
Questions to ponder
How will you balance paid work, unpaid work and demands of family/personal
relationships?
Role in domestic partnership and how to decide who does what and how does the work
unfold in the private realm of the home.
Childcare? Who? Division?

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Intro to Women and Gender Studies WGST 1F90
Week 12
2
Women have always worked; done a wide variety of paid labour skilled and
unskilled laundry, teaching, nursing, midwifery, etc.
o Women have always worked\
Skilled and unskilled
Women have also worked without pay; the unpaid work women do in the home is
often work which goes unnoticed.
o Formal economy.
o Informal economy.
Volunteer work.
Goes unnoticed since unrecognized.
Stats Can recently reported that men are increasingly participating in the unpaid
household labour; yet women still report feeling more time stressed’ than their
male counterparts.
Gazzo (2010) refers to this as being time crunched.
o Gazzo is a researcher in unpaid work.
Be aware of invisible and visible forms of work so we dont fall into the habit of
over valuing the paid labour and not seeing the value of the unpaid work.
Rise of Precarious Labour
From the 1950s to the 1070s the Canadian economy was buoyant.
o Post-War.
o Economy booming.
Women were pulled into the labour market by expanding civil service
opportunities.
o Civil service public servants had many more women.
Teachers.
Nurses.
In 1974 minimum wages for women were no longer allowed in all provinces.
Lasted about 25 years with a recession in the early 1980s and a second in the
1990s.
o Real incomes decline.
o Labour markets became less stable.
o Less secure, less well paid, more temporary and part-time.
o Rise of precarious jobs.
Real incomes have declined, and the labour market has become less stable.
Jobs for men and women are less secure, and more jobs are temporary or part
time.
Shaping Life Processes
Three central processes that shape our life experience that have to do with paid
work and unpaid work.
o Production.
o Reproduction.
o Distribution.
Production: Paid work, the security of our position, saving for the
future, our relationship to the economy.
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Intro to Women and Gender Studies WGST 1F90
Week 12
3
Production refers to care work, volunteerism, and domestic labour
invisible, unpaid and undervalued.
Volunteerism.
Care work (children and family)
Unpaid work does not count in the GDP and in government
statistics.
Without our unpaid work our productive labour could
not occur Marxist feminism thinking
Reproduction
o Social reproduction of dependents.
Children.
Parents.
Relatives.
Partners as well as the biological reproduction of children.
o Reproductive work also includes: prodicng a healthy educated population.
Distribution
o How services are rendered and distributed.
o Who does what for whom?
o How are government services provided?
o Who receives which services?
Low income socio-economic status can dictate what services are
available to access.
Production work (paid labour) has been associated with the public realm while
reproductive work has remained part of the private realm and invisible.
o The work of raising and educating parents.
o Helping elderly parents.
o Helping a neighbour out.
Not recognized on any GDP therefore not recognized by
government.
Feminists have refused the idea that these two realms public and private are
entirely separate.
We have over valued productive at the expense of unpaid work.
Example: many women chose’ to engage in part time work in the service sector
as a way to balance family responsibilities.
The feminization of poverty is due to systemic discrimination and bias.
o Who does what work and what is the value of that labour.
o Women do more unpaid work at the expense of paid labour and miss out
on things such as pensions and benefits.
Two Forms of Care Work
Care work is raced, gendered and classed. Involves paid and unpaid work.
The care work we provide has to do with many aspects of our status.
Statistics Canada indicates that the higher a womans income the less likely she
is to spend significant hours in a day on housework.
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