Class Notes (834,721)
Canada (508,692)
ARCU 3100 (16)
Lecture 8

Lecture 8 America & Capitals.docx

12 Pages
77 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Architecture Urban
Course
ARCU 3100
Professor
Yves Gosselin
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 8 America the Beautiful vs. America the Ugly th March 12  2013 1893 Chicago World’s Fair • The event that becomes one of starting points of urbanistic principle  • The first time the World Fair leaves Europe • 400  anniversary of Colombus’ discovery of America • Ameiricans demonstrate their importance of industrial production  • They believe they are better or equal to the European empires Chicago 1893 • Most important architects/designers inAmerica participated in this fair • City Beautiful Movement significant in America and also Australia and New Zealand The Key Actors • The Beaux­Arts architects • They will team up various professionals including Burnham from Chicago • They deicde that he architectural style to impose is the neo­classical style • The irony is that this occurs at the point in Chicago where Louis Sullivan where he  develops the Chicago style – this is a unique style ot Chicago, yet it’s not used Charles Mulford Robinson • The individual who, through his writing, termed ‘City Beautiful Movement’ • Talks about theprinciples that were put into place by Olmsted, Burnham and those of the   Beaux­Arts Washington D.C. • City Beautiful will spread quickly • Washington D.C. will bring these individuals to study a plan for the city • The MacMillan Commission in 1902 will stress the importance of the central mall • One end is the congress, where the Senate lives • The mall is intersecting between this and the monument at the other end MacMillan Commission Plan • An approach to the architecture and urban planning • To this day, there are no highrises in Washington D.C. – there is actually a height limit Revision to the Plan as set out by Pierre L’Enfant in 1790 Aerial View of Washington Monument and the Mall area • Axis gets set up and it becomes much cleaner after the proposal Comparison of Urban Structure • Similarities of axial Baroque planning of Washington to Versailles and Paris San Francisco Plan 1906 • Burnham will be hired in various places for various plans • Why Burnham was hired for this plan – earthquake happened that wiped out much of San  Francisco The Chicago Plan of 1909 • Considered a masterwork • Burnham was an architect  • The plan will show major new civic buildings, parks, and new systems • Parkways – design from Olmsted; most of the North east industrial city will go through a  period where these parkways are desgiend • Few in the states have been preserved in their state as the ones in Ottawa Innovations in planning proposals • He will go beyond the city planning and addresses a regional approach • He goes way out beyond te developed area in his approach to city building • Takes into consideration the projected growth of Chicago over 25 years • Looks at rapid transit th • Chicago is the equivalent in the 19  century as a major airport hub o Everything in the west and south came here by rail and then sent to the Northeastern  area o Everything that was industrialized came from the east and then sent to the west o Was the hub of the railway system, and hence the hub of the economy • Burnham also looks ot create a legal framework in terms of zoning, process for building • Prior to this, there had been a somewat laissez­faire approach to city planning Urban Scale Proposals • Looks at waterfront and green corridor along the lakeshore • There’s a civic center in te middle  • There’s a zone that spreads out into suburban areas Proposals for the Waterfront • Civic center not built View of te Civic Center, looking west • Not implemented, but had many proposals Downtown Proposals • To link waterfront with civic centre • Much of the raod network in Chicago is there today • The waterfront is also there Perspective Views of varous civic areas • WAshingotn’s uniform height was rejected by the architectural committee and by  developpers • Sullivan’s high rise ideas permiet buildignst o go beyond the imposed ceiling Diagrams for rationalization of circulation, people and goods • Right hand side – shows how freight came into Chicago • Also looks at how street traffics are regulated Chicago Today • Park system along lakeshore has been preserved and valued by community Downtown canal system today • You can loop through Chicago through the canal system • Chicago suffered from a major fire which had a significant impact on existing buildings • Everyting in Chicago is actually one level higher – for water distribution New York at the Turn of the Century • Buildings created in a haphazard way • Most of the industries are in the northeast and Midwest Early Suburbia USA • Higher class – want to escape the foregners in te city (i.e. Jews, Blacks) o Best example – water Maya  • They have the wealth to escape • Middle class started going to the suburbs that were opening up • Railway suburbs, streetway suburbs Painting showing the urban reality of the Amercnan industrial city • Middle class not only fleeing the ‘invaders’, but the effects of heavy industry close by, the  pollution it creates, etc • The suburban ideal emerges as a transition from the late 19  and early 20  century The Suburban ideal • Between 1912 – 1930, people are becoming significantly more mobile • People avoiding ethnic tensions Rockfeller Center • 1930s – Great Depression  • credit was difficult • people were litearlly starving in streets • a number of wealthy Americans decide to participatein the re­investment • There is an indivudal or family in each of these cities that is extremely wealthy Seagram Building, Mies van der Rohe & Lever House by SOM • Introduction of modernism into the American city • SOM is one of those firms starting in WWII and is still one of the top architectural firms in  the USA • WWII was one of the catalysts that helped the US get out of their depression New York – highrises Framingham, Mass. 1947 • Significant change in suburbia after WWII • Babyboom had a significant effect in USA and Canada • Nature of urban realm changed • Home ownership was the ideal prior to the WII, and continues to be an ideal but becomes a  uniform ideal for all citizens Levittown image & Family image • Rockcliffe village is the equivalent to Manuel park? • Where all the rich people in Ottawa live • Manor cliff – basically Rockcliffe wannabes – these houses have seen addition,  revnotations, etc Levittown – first 6000 houses Track housing as a form of industrial production • Like applying assembly­line productin ot construction • Land needs to be modified for this landform Evolution of Retail Shopping • Suburbia, because eof zoning, had no main street • The retail shopping mall emerged • Later, regional shopping centers emerge, followed by the big box shopping center The Regional Shopping Centre • These start ot occupy major areas in the suburban landscape Office Buildings • Related to this in some way • The white­collar worker is moving into a suburban environment • They ask themselves if there is a rational to remain in downtown • Eisenhower, when he became president, said that there should be the ability to move troops  quickly across the US – the intersate highway system was built to move troops, not cars • Interstate system like a circulation to move goods quickly o i.e. most companies will locate at the intersection of an interstate • the shift away from the northeast, in terms of economic power • a form of office building designed for subrnan location becomes developed • Office parks become established Texaco Headquarters • Many of the decisions who want to go into suburns related to mobility – • In Harrison, New York • Modernist school Conoco Headquartes John Deere World Headquarters Weyerhauser Headquarters (SOM) • Has integration of landcape into the design of the façade  • Sites in lush setting – largest forestry product company in U.S. • First building to introduce open plan office spaces – got rid of indivual offices and made  very floor as an open plan • Beginnings of open plan concept Houston, Texas • Devlopmetn of what attitude to have in planning to regularion  • The idea of building regulations coming from Haussmann – there will be a debate in the 70s  about indivudal projects on their merit and let the public marketplace designate their  location • When every developer owns a piece of land and want to build a tower, until the market  demans one of those, people hold onto the land and develop parking lots and are waiting on  the economic opportunity to build a tower/skyscraper/etc • There’ a higher market value on parking development because it generates more money Inner city degradation • Assassination of Martin Luther King will have an impact on cities • Because of economic situations of cities, many o the white­collar workers abandon  downtown, there’s no economic base to rebuilt these areas • Entire areas that have been bulldozed and are just left – no development done • Canada has regional appraohces in urban planning • In U.S. constitution – if a group of people get together to build houses and infrastrucrure,  they can apply to be an independent municipality • In order to escape the financial responsibilities fo the inner city, most of these develop  incrementally o i.e. the center of Chicago is this little central area o in contrast to Cleveland where there’s no economic base  • Detroit now declaring bankruptcy – the state doesn’t know what to do • As suburban communities develop, they form independent municipalities – they might have  shared a boundary with another unicipality, but they were independent – could raise  property taxes • Best schools in suburbs –based on property taxes • City has no economic base • Canada has always had the ability ot modify cities rationally so that there can be a  redistribution of wealth o i.e. if someone in Rockcliffe area pays $300 000 in property tax, it benefits someone  in centertown Lysander • reparallels what happens in UK  • in light with Ebenezer’s Howard’s garden city thinking Edge Cities – Southern Califoria • phenomenon kn
More Less

Related notes for ARCU 3100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit