Class Notes (838,403)
Canada (510,881)
Chemistry (175)
CHEM 1005 (2)
Pam Wolff (1)
Lecture

CHEM 1005.docx

8 Pages
194 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Chemistry
Course
CHEM 1005
Professor
Pam Wolff
Semester
Fall

Description
CHEM 1005 ­ MONDAY Sept. 17th NOTES Focus: exact numbers: Counted  (not measured) *have infinite sigfigs, exactly counted. *almost always integers *defined: e.g. #cm in an inch is defined as 2.54 = meaning there is exactly 2.54  cm in an inch This is not typical of most  conversion factors. Prefix values: kilo = 1000 An atom of uranium is "made of: 92 protons (mass, proton = 1.6725x 10^­27kg) 144 neutrons (mass, neutron = 1.6749x 10^­27kg) 92 electrons (mass, electron = 9.109x10 ^­31kg) Calculate the expected mass of one uranium atom: step #1:   multiply it out: 92 (1.6725x10^­27) + 144(1.6749x10^­27) + 92 (9.109x10^­31) =  3.951394028x 10^­25kg step #2:backtrack 92 (1.6725x10^­27)   = 1.5387 x 10 ^­25   *only 5 sigfigs  144(1.6749x10^­27) = 2.411856 x 10 ^­25   *only 5 sigfigs 92 (9.109x10^­31) = 8.38028 x 10 ^­29    *only 4 sigfigs p+  1 . 5 3 8 7         x 10^­25kg m~  2. 4 1 1 8 5 6    x10^­25kg In order to make all calculations in same  scientific notation, move decimal places e~  0.0 0 0 8 3 0 2 8 x 10^­25kg = 3.951394028 x 20^­25 *what decimal places are significant?* only to 4 decimal places = 3.9514 x10^­25kg • NEXT TERM  log /ln  Take a log e.g. pH of an acid solution measured value:  1.0 x 10^­4 log (1.0x 10^­4)  * only 2 sigfigs = ­4, this came from the exponent *when using logs,  sigfigs are only after decimal exeption to the rule* Needs to have 2 sigfigs in answer = ­4.00 pH  = 4.00  since pHh is never a negative number :) anti­log of ­4.00 you can only take an antilog of a log, not just any old  number. Step#1:  count decimal places in the input (2) INTO CALCULATOR:   (antilog button) 10^x ­4.00 and it will return you to the original  number :) yay. CHEM 1005 ­ MONDAY Sept. 24th NOTES ­TOPIC 2­ The Atom: Protons in the nucleus = atomic number (unique characteristic of the atom) Atom = electrically neutral ( same number of protons and electrons) Isotopes = atoms of same element with different #'s of neutrons, Mass Number: total # of particles in nucleus. symbol : A   (#p + #n) No fixed number of neutrons, approx range of neutrons needed to sustain nucleus  structure.* Day 2 on Atoms: Probing the arrangement of electrons; Electromagnetic radiation!   = light, and both the lower energy and the higher energy  non­visible parts of the spectrum. ­­­­­+­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­+­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­+­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­+­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­+­­­­­­­­­­­ +­­­­­­­­­­­­­+­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­> E radio               microwave        Infra­red    Visible (red ­ violet) UV X­ray  Gamma <1m 1mm 10^­7 10^­8 10^­11 <10 ^­12 EMR (electromagnetic radiation) as a wave: Trough to trough = 0 point to 0 point.  wavelength = lambda  = λ Frequency:  1 /time it took from peak to peak. (nu) = Greek Letter How many waves go by in a given interval ( usually 1 second) nu in units of 1/s. or S^­1. = Hz lambda and nu (v) are related:  λ = C/V Speed of light: refers to speed of light in a vacuum: C = 3.00 x 10 ^8 m/s EMR as particles: photons: "particle" of light whose energy depends on wavelengths of the radiation. only one wavelength present (monochromatic) Every photon will have the same energy. (E) E = hc/ λ defined as: E 1 photon = h(constant) c(speed of light) /  λ ( wavelength of EMR) h = 6.626 x 10^­34 J.s c = 3.00x 10^8m/s λ = meters E = Joules, J CHEM 1005 ­  MONDAY OCT 1st NOTES Calculating Chemical potential energy: Rydberg Equation for Hydrogen: Ephoton involved            =  Rh(1/ni^2 ­ 1/nf^2) in and transition of H Rh: Rydberg constant for H n : allowed levels for e­ in H    1,2,3……. ni: number of levels where e­ starts  (initial) nf: number of levels where e­ finishes  (final) Diagram of energy levels: E = Rh (1/ni^2 ­ 1/nf^2)    Rh = 2.18 x 10^­18 J Question #1:  a)Calculate the energy of the photon involved in an electron moving from the second to  the fourth level of hydrogen. E = 2.18 x 10^­18J ( 1/2^2 ­ 1/4^2) E=  2.18 x 10^­18 (0.1875) E = [4.0875 x 10^­19] = 4.09x 10^­19 J b) Give the wavelength of the E.M.R. associated with that photon, in nm.  1 E = hv    ­ used for frequency h = 6.626 x  10^­34 J/s E = hc/λ     ­ used for wavelength c = 3.00 x 10^8 m/s 4.0875 x 10^­19J = (6.626x10^­34 js)(3.00 x 10^8 m/s)              λ = [4.8631193 x 10^­7]  = ONLY 3 SIGFIGS      λ = 4.86 x 10^­7 m ­CHANGE INTO NANOMETERS­ = 4.86 x 10^­7    {X 10^9} = 4.86 X 10^2 nm Q:  c)  What is this energy, in kJ/mol? (4.0875 x10^­19) 1­ 4.0875 x 10^­19  { x 10^­3]} = KJ   = 4.0875 x 10^­22 mol ­ avagadros constant = 6.02 x 10^23/mol 2­   (4.0875 x 10^­22 JK)(6.02 x 10^23) =246 KJ/mol CHEM 1005 ­ MONDAY OCT 15th Midterm next week! up until friday Electron configurations: identify: highest subshell valence electrons etc. EMR hydrogen multielectric atoms electron configurations energy emitted questions When we need more detail than "just" shell & subshell    (Where an electron is most  likely to be found) ORBITAL DIAGRAM: recall:  m­value ("how big") SHELL l­value   ("s,p, d, or f" ­what shape) SUBSHELL ml ­ "tilt"  ORBITAL  ­­­­­­­> address  of the electron orbital diagram is a pictogram. line to represent each separate orbital (within a given subshell, within a given shell) arrow to indicate each electron in each orbital   ^ or 1/2^ = 1/2 spin for every e­   v or 1/2v = ­1/2 spin Pauli's Exclusion Principle: no two electrons in the same atom may have the same 4 quantum numbers = if two electrons are in the same orbital, they must have opposite spins Shell/subshell/orbital comb
More Less

Related notes for CHEM 1005

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit