Class Notes (837,484)
Canada (510,274)
CLCV 1002 (123)
Lecture

CLCV 1002 Class 6.docx

2 Pages
90 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Classical Civilization
Course
CLCV 1002
Professor
Roger Blockley
Semester
Winter

Description
February 14 , 2014 th 5  Century BC: There is no sign of politics in the pre­classical Greek cities; everything was ordained  hierarchically until the later 5  century BC. Politics provides a way of incorporating individual  views into the policies and laws, as well as elected officials and offices; and the beginning of  laws being written down. There is also an emergence of individual participation in the political  sphere. In the Greek polis, the interaction between the individual and the state provided the basis  for modern politics. One’s individuality and status was determined by the judgment of others, it is action orientated –  competence is stressed and the values are amoral. It is a contest of the strong versus the weak.  Kalos kai agathos: beautiful and good – the Greeks believed that if you were beautiful, you were  a good person. The contest system is a shame culture, if you lost you were shamed by the city.  The guilt culture is aimed towards intent “he means well” – used when you screwed up.  Alcibiades is the best documented example of the contest system. Xenos: “guest friend.” Metics referred to a resident alien, one who did not have citizen rights in  his or her Greek city­state (polis) of residence. Kurios means “lord” or “master.” A woman could not enter into a contract herself and  arrangements were made by her guardian or Kurios. For an unmarried woman the Kurios would  be her father, and if dead, brothers an uncle or relative would be the Kurios. Women were seen as  their only purpose was for the procreation of children and the survival of the oikos. The kurios  stands for the protection of the family. Marriage took place when the man was 30, after he was finished military training and was able to  form a household. Women were married around the age of 15. There was no particular ceremony  for marriage; it was simply the act of living together. The dowry offered was an act of  respectability. Virginity was essential
More Less

Related notes for CLCV 1002

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit