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Lecture

Greek Painting Continued.docx


Department
Classical Civilization
Course Code
CLCV 1002
Professor
C L C V

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March 15th 2012 CLCV 1002 B
Greek Painting Continued
Black Figure style: Developed in Athens (Attica)
- Black figure style not quite realistic but getting there (adding more detail,
- Greek art developed from abstract to idealism to realistic depiction
- Engraved detail
- Detail added in this style is line but this doesn’t make body appear more realistic
The Classical Period: Greek culture hits its peak after Persian wars (especially in Athens)
- If reverse process of black figure style, can get more realistic portrayal of body.
Red figure style (5th century BC): Making background black and leaving figures in natural color of clay
(black figure does the opposite, bodies in black and background in clay color)
Body and motion now depicted in still images, allows it to appear to be more realistic.
- Figures in rapid motion
- Clothes swaying
- Writhing snakes
Kleophrades
Painted detail: Clay slips and shading used to show detail
- Can get different shades of color by chemically altering the balance of material within clay
- Begin to use shading, allowing to eventually indicate 3 dimensions (shoe depth)
Depiction of mental states/ emotion: Depict emotion of humans so appear more realistic in terms of
psychology
Impressionistic style: Use blotches and blurs of color to build up color and give depth
- Originally used this cartoon like drawing ( everything depicted by line )
- Vase painting start to imitate wall paintings (who work in fresco techniques)
In wall paintings, we get true impressionism
- Very few wall paintings from antiquity, only ones we have are from tombs
- Ex: Painting of Hades abducting Persephone (Vergina, 4th century BC)
Large Scale Sculpture
Materials: Wood, ivory (perishable material)
- Terracotta (clay)
- Around 600 BC start sculpting in stone (marble) on a large scale, influenced by Egypt
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