Class Notes (837,435)
Canada (510,273)
COMM 1101 (114)
Lecture

Partial Lecture Notes

10 Pages
62 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication Studies
Course
COMM 1101
Professor
Chris Russill
Semester
Fall

Description
COMM1101A Chris Russill [email protected] Evolution of Comunication: ­Printing Press, Stone and Chisel, Spoken Word, Noises, Code, Smoke Signals, Cave  Drawings, Carrier Pigeons, “The Great Books” (sacred texts), Bells, Horns, Postal  Service, Telephone, Telegraph, Lighthouse, Radio, Television, Whistle, Internet, Sign  Language, Film, Symbols, Radar, Brail.  Socrates ­philosopher, doesn’t like rich and powerful people, died of hemlock (after charged with  corrupting the youth and impiety) at his own choice, invented Socratic method (question  opponent until they agreed with him), Public Speaking (know your audience, know what  you’re talking about, organizing in coherent way).  September 24      Cl ss ­We have the wrong idea about the internet and how it works it’s effects on us (Carr). ­Starts with Marshal McLuhan who is changing early media. McLuhan> the medium is  the message. McLuhan criticizes skeptics and enthusiasts.  ­McLuhans Prophecy: the linear mind is dissolving. (because of electricity and light). ­School’s don’t understand media and so they will become obsolete. Lives are being  reorganized because of media.  ­The way we use things defines them. (the medium is the message). McLuhan thinks that  the message can’t be complete, that the audience has to fill in the meaning. ­Media isn’t just the Pipes through which things flow, it’s our environment. HAL And Me ­Hal used a prophecy to show how we become emerged in computer tech. ­That first computer made computing more personal. Computer connected him to things.  Life seems better. ­When information doesn’t come as the internet gives it to him, Carr gets easily frustrated  and angry because information isn’t coming like the internet gives it out. ­Carr thinks he himself, is a human HAL. The internet is making him this way. It’s not  that internet doesn’t not make people intelligent, he just thinks it’s a “shallow form” of  intelligence. Retraining our brains to function like computers (reducing ourselves to  information processing devices).  Fixed Brain, Flexible Brain ­Brain changes based on media we use. ­The experience in the world changes the way your brain works. ­Changes us in fundamental ways. ­“You become what you’re doing” ­long patterned experience alters how your brain works. Instrumentalist v. Determinist ­A lot of people bring instrumentalist approach to tech. They think that it’s how it’s used  that matters. ­Determinst makes more sense: CLOCK. Shows how abstract sense of time initiated  through clock is not natural. But it’s clear effect of ubiquity of clock technology.  ­Repeated use of something re­wires us to continue to do what we’ve already done.  October 1     , 2013 Lectur  ­Plato’s story: ban poets (Homer etc…) from education because of its’ content (written  in blood/corrupting) and because Plato feared persuasion on an irrational level. ­People used to etch messages into surfaces like: parchment, papyrus, stone, sand, wax  and animal skins. (each had their own benefits and cons) These different writing surfaces  each influenced the communicative message in their own way (ie: easy to transport, long  lasting etc…).  ­With books, it’s easy to flip pages and move on and find order quickly but with scrolls,  it’s difficult to find what you’re looking for. ­Writing was difficult and expensive so the prose’s where not expressive like what we are  used to today. ­Oral tradition still dominates writing back then when writing was just invented and for  years after.  ­Eventually, writing improved and dominated over the oral culture (ie: spaces, spelling  patterns, word order conventions…) ­Silent reading is an innovation (reading used to be out loud). ­printing press allows for words to be reproduced (democratization of the literate mind,  where it “all begins to happen”). ­Guttenberg bible was one of first things printed. However, only a select few could read  this bible.  ­Writing dominated for like 500 years, but now, it is changing. The first threat occurs in  the mid­twentieth century which was the Audio/Television era.  ­Internet is a fundamental challenge. ­Neil Postman’s  book: Amusing Ourselves to Death says that image based entertainment  (ie: tv and news) was dangerous because it displaced the mind and allowed you form  opinions and judgments on it. The media system was not focused on understanding, but  simply on gaining your attention.  ­Stephenson: We used to interact with machines through text. We now click on graphics  and images to tell our machines what to do. For Stephensons, this was a disaster because  it collected knowledge and we weren’t able to get familiar with how they work. ­Powerpoints become a convention (As soon as one is asked to do a presentation, people  immediately go to Power point before thinking of content etc). ­Powerpoint is often unexplained (ie: the correlation between slides and points etc). ­For Tufte, it’s hard to use power point to explain yourself because it’s limiting.  ­We’re so used to having something take our attention quickly that we are having a heard  to keeping focus on something for a long time and deeply.  October 8     , 2013  ­Peoples first interaction with computing was through the telephone. ­People used to hack phones ­3 STAGES (Ceruzzi)  ­5 ELEMENTS (Ceruzzi). > Control (software), Storage, Calculation, Communication,  Integrated Circuits (processing power).  ­4 THREADS > Digitization, Solid State Electronics Industry, Human Machine Interface  (issues of Freedom, Intelligence), Convergence.  IBM, Microsoft, Apple IBM: International Business Machines ­Tabulating things/the automation of counting ­typewriter ­turned into electric machines ­SAGE COMPUTER (1956) (IBM + MIT made this machine for US Military).  Sage computer was developing real time processing.  ­at the end of the 1960s, IBM started selling machines without all of the parts.  You had to buy the rest of the stuff.  Microsoft: Founded in 1975 by Bill Gates and Paul Allen ­Sells software (nothing physical) (information on how to work computers). ­Microsoft used to release bugged software and when people would call to find a  solution, they’d sell the solution and get feedback at the same time. ­Bill Gates wanted Internet Explorer to be the best browser so it came with each  machine and software purchased.  October 22     , 20 3 ­Computers can think v.s. computers can’t think. ­Tourring Test: “man in one room, computer in another and referee in another. If the  referee cant tell the difference between both, then computers can think”.  ­Watson, first machine on jeopardy, beat the raining chapmions.  November 19     , 2013 (Video Game Guest Speaker)   th Mock Exam, November 26 , 2:30­4:30 Download exam from CU Learn, write it and bring your essay with you to tutorial on  November 26 .  th There are no tutorials or lecture the week of Dec 3.  Brief History of Games ­Mainframes and Early History ­Playing at Home ­Networks and “casual” gaming. ­First game was “Space Wars”. Couldn’t pass a copy of the game. You had to send the  instructions on how to write the game to a same computer.  ­People then played at Arcades. (Still paying to use computing power). ­In 1986, Legend of Zelda came out on NES. ­In 1995, Sony released the Playstation.  th  Tuesday, Jan, 7     , 2014­ Lecture  Propaganda Triump Of the Will­ 1935 Nazi Propaganda film.  Trying to show how Hitler is an honourable man, glorifies him. th  Tuesday, January 14     ­ Lecture on Propaganda   Disney Movie with American Government and RCA: “Food Will Win The War”. ­The term propaganada is fairly new, only about 500 years old. Plato ­Tried to think about ideal state. >Main idea was to get rid of the Poets and get them away from education of  youth. Reasons: didn’t like the content of the poems. (curriculum) (too  violent, immoral…) and he worried about the substitution for  persuasion of a rational argument (he was worried that poets could  convince people easily to think certain ways). ­Recounts story from Socrates: Socrates offers how to keep Polis intact and one of the  ways to do this is by saying “I will speak, although I really know not how to look you in  the face, or in what words to utter the audacious fiction… They (the citizens) are to be  told that their youth was a dream, and the education and training which they received  from us, an appearance only; in reality during all that time they were being formed and  fed in the womb of the earth…” The Noble Lie:  ­Lie to secure the unity of the state. Repeat and repeat until it’s just natural. ­Cursaders used to walk around with crosses all of the time. Martin Luther ­propagation of the faith. John Brown ­two ways to think of propaganda. Neutralist: no negative connotations to the word “propaganda”. Simply a way  of  persuading people but it is not negative. Propaganda used to be seen as good because it  could end wars.  Moralist:  To use techniques routed in military science to persuade someone (who is  similar to you) is unethical and not moral.  Canadian Examples of Propaganda ­Oldest example is the Railroads. They supported tourism and immigration. Politicians  where interested in that because they didn’t want Americans taking land. Train people  wanted it because they had lots of commutes to do with different agricultural products.  They tried to create beautiful images of Canada in order to encourage people to come to  Canada from all over the world.  ­One of most prominent examples is in War. WW2 Germans learnt a lot from the North  American propaganda from WW1.  ­In Canada during WW1, many people played different roles in supporting the war as  seen in propaganda. Trying to get them to go fight the war in Europe or to send their sons  to go fight in the war.  ­WW2: you saw that nations would use propaganda to try and keep a nation together in  times of war. CBC was routinely used as a source of propaganda in Canada. CBC was not  aloud to report on any negative stories while conscription in Canada was being debated.  ­Is propaganda ever effective? Is our identity and the ability to have national pride (ie:  proud Canadian) a form of propaganda?  Definitions of Propaganda “Propaganda is the management of collective attitudes by the manipulation of significant  symbols”.­ Harold Laswell “Propaganda is the deliberate, systematic attempt to shape perceptions, manipulate  cognitions, and direct behavior to achieve a response that furthers the desired intent of the  propagandist.” Types of Propaganda: White (source is correctly identified and it announces itself as  propaganda), Grey (messaging that you can’t tell who author is, not clear), Black  (misinformation, disinformation, attempt to misidentify the source).  Ghost Writing: When someone writes something for someone else to take credit for. Propaganda always have a persuasive attempt but we can’t call all forms of persuasion  propagandistic.  Effects:  ­Propaganda can have no effect, people often believe that they are not persuaded. ­Propaganda   can   interject   ideas/beliefs   into   ones   brain   (Massive,   Direct  Effects/Hypodermic Syringe Model). ­Propaganda has minimal effects. All of us have multiple roles but every message we  receive is mediated by our roles. ­Propaganda has indirect effects. Ie: Nazi propaganda was not popular 
More Less

Related notes for COMM 1101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit