Class Notes (835,342)
Canada (509,116)
COMP 1001 (23)
Allan (1)
Lecture

Jan 7 - Intro to Computers.docx

4 Pages
145 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Computer Science
Course
COMP 1001
Professor
Allan
Semester
Winter

Description
Intro to Computers 01/07/2013 CRT (old monitor) CPU = most important and expensive part Memory = next most important and expensive part CPU socket = brain of computer – generates a lot of heat – needs a fan to cool it down A computer is an electronic device that can store, retrieve and process data. All its parts are  categorized into one of the following: 1. CPU 2. Input device 3. Output device 4. Auxiliary storage device – performs quick calculations etc. Main memory is very fast and expensive while storage devices are cheap. Also, main memory is  extremely volatile – it is easier to lose data on it, and it could crash. CPU: Fetches, decodes and executes instructions from the main memory. Main memory: Circuits that can store data. The CPU obtains data from it very quickly. Blaise Pascal invented the mechanical calculator. Charles Babbage = father of computers, who originally created the Analytical Engine – the first general­ purpose digital computer (1833). It wasn’t actually built till 1943 (in the form of Harvard Mark I). Ada Lovelace was an English mathematician and writer mainly known for her work on Babbage’s  Analytical Engine. She is known as the first programmer.  There are 5 generations of computers: • Vacuum Tubes (1940­1952) • Transistors (1952­1964) • Large Scale Integrated Circuits (1964­1971) • Very Large Scale Integrated Circuits (1971­1990) (no air­conditioning required from this stage  onwards) • Microprocessor, higher storage capacity, multimedia (risk generation) Kinds of computers: 1. Supercomputer = requires its own special room with air­conditioning as it generates a lot of heat. It  is super as it performs hundreds of millions of orders in a second. It contains thousands of CPUs. In  1997, Deep Blue, a supercom
More Less

Related notes for COMP 1001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit