Class Notes (838,058)
Canada (510,633)
Economics (298)
ECON 1000 (235)
Lecture

Chapter 11.docx

11 Pages
72 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 1000
Professor
Paul Haddow
Semester
Fall

Description
Externalities 10/16/2013 Externalities and Market Inefficiency Externalities: the uncompensated impact of one person’s actions on the well­being of a bystander ­ Externalities cause markets to allocate resources inefficiently Negative Externalities ­ An externality that negatively effects the well being of bystanders. Ex: Pollution from an aluminum factory ­ The cost of society for producing a product with a negative externality is greater than the cost of the  producers ­ The social cost is equal to the private costs of the producers plus the costs to those bystanders affected  by the externality ­ The social cost curve is always above the supply curve on the graph ­ The difference between the two curves shows the cost of the externality ­ Instead of using the equilibrium to decide how much to produce, we now use the optimum point (the point  at which the demand curve intersects with the social cost curve) See Page 209­210 for deadweight loss calculations ­ The deadweight loss can be calculated as the area between the demand curve and the social cost curve  between Qmarket and Qoptimum ­ In order to minimize or eliminate the deadweight loss, the government can impose a tax on the producers,  raising the supply curve. If the tax is equal to the cost of the externality, the supply curve and the social cost  curve will coincide making the optimum point the same as the equilibrium point Internalizing the Externality: alter incentives so that people take account of the external effects of their  actions ­ Negative externalities lead markets to produce a larger quantity than is socially desirable. Positive Externalities ­ A good or service that benefits the bystanders. Ex: Education, not only does education benefit those who  are enrolled but those with an education are able to go on and help and benefit the entire community ­ In this case the social value curve corresponds with the demand curve, it is higher than the demand  curve. The difference between the two represents the value of the externality ­ The optimum point is where the social value curve meets the supply curve ­ Positive externalities lead markets to produce a smaller quantity than is socially desirable. ­ To remedy the issue, the government can subsidize goods that have positive externalities. Public Policies Toward Externalities ­ Governmental solutions to externalities Command and Control Policies: Regulation ­ The government can remedy an externality by making certain behaviors either required or forbidden. Ex: it  is illegal to dump poisonous chemicals into the water supply ­ The government can put regulations on the amount of pollution a factory can emit  Market Based Policy 1: Corrective Taxes and Subsidies Corrective Taxes: taxes enacted to correct the effects of negative externalities ­ Economists prefer taxes over regulations when dealing with pollution because taxes can reduce pollution  at a lower cost to society. ­ Corrective taxes raise revenue for the government while enhancing the economic efficiency. Market Based Policy 2: Tradable Pollution Permits ­ Two firms exchange pollution permits for money, Ex: each firm is initially allowed to produce 300 glops of  pollution, one firm gives the other 100 glops for $5 million Objections to the Economic Analysis of Pollution ­ Environmentalists believe that pollution permits and taxes should not be used to limit pollution because no  price can be placed on clean air and water ­ Economists disagree because, people face tradeoffs. While clean air and water are important few people  would be willing to give up the high quality life we lead for clean air and water Private Solutions to Externalities Types of Private Solutions ­ Moral codes and social sanctions People do not litter , not just because of the law but because it is against our moral codes “Do to others as you wish would be done to you” a moral injunction that tells us to take account for the  affect of our actions on others. ­ Charities Charities such as greenpeace make it there goal to protect the environment. Non­profit and funded with  private donations. Colleges and universities receive gifts from alumni, corporations, and foundations as an incentive to attend. ­ Self interest of relevant parties Ex: beekeeper and apple grower are right next to each other. Both benefit from the others products, but  since they do not work together the amount of bees may be to large for the amount of apple trees. They  must internalize externalities by having one firm by the other, so they can work out how many bees and  trees to keep. ­ Contract Instead of buying another firm to ensure both products are at their maximum production point, two firms can  enter in a contract, an agreement to how much of their product to produce. The Coase Theorem ­ The proposition that if private parties can bargain without cost over the allocation of resources, they can  solve the problem of externalities on their own ­ Whatever the initial distribution of rights, the interested parties can always reach a bargain in which  everyone is better off and the outcome is efficient. Why Private Solutions Do Not Always Work ­ Private solutions only work if both parties can easily reach an agreement, this is not always the case ­ Transaction Cost: the costs that parties incur in the process of agreeing and following through on a  bargain. Ex: both parties live far away and would need to pay for a plane to come up with an agreement ­ Bargaining fails, sometimes each party tries to hold out for a better deal. Making an agreement  impossible. ­ The number of people interested is large. This becomes difficult because it is harder to please everyone. ­ When private solutions do not prevail, the government can step in. Public Goods and Common Resources 10/16/2013 The Different Kinds of Goods ­ Goods can be grouped according to two characteristics:  1. Is the good excludable? Can people be prevented from using the good? 2. Is the good rival in consumption? Does one person’s use of the good diminish another’s ability to use it? ­ Excludability: The property of a good whereby a person can be prevented from using it ­ Rival in Consumption: The property of a good whereby one person’s use diminishes other people’s use. ­ Four Types of Goods Private Goods: Goods that are both excludable and rival. Public Goods: Goods that are neither excludable nor rival. Common Resources: Goods that are rival but not excludable. Natural Monopoly: Goods that are excludable but not rival. Public Goods ­ Ex: Fireworks The Free­Rider Problem ­ Free­Rider: a person who receives the benefit of a good but avoids paying for it. ­ Because public goods are not excludable, the free rider problem prevents the private market from  supplying them (because they will not make any profit). The government can provide the public good and  pay for it with tax revenue if they decide the total benefits exceed the total costs. Some Important Public Goods ­ National Defence Public Goods and Common Resources 10/16/2013 Once the country is defended, there is no way to prevent a citizen form enjoying the comfort of this defence.  (nonexcludable) When one person enjoys the benefit it does not prevent the benefit of another person. ­ Basic Research General knowledge only. Specific technological knowledge can be patented making it excludable. General knowledge cannot be excluded, for example once a mathematician proves a theory it is available to  everyone. It is also not rival, the use of the theory by one person does not prevent the use of it by another. Firms spend a lot of money on research that can be patented and sold but none on general knowledge, in  hopes 
More Less

Related notes for ECON 1000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit