Class Notes (836,148)
Canada (509,657)
History (652)
HIST 3209 (11)
B.S.Elliot (11)
Lecture 2

Lecture 2.docx

4 Pages
88 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 3209
Professor
B.S.Elliot
Semester
Winter

Description
Canadthn Urban History Jan 8  2013 IMPERIAL TOWN PLANNING : Town and Crown Face­off Talk about research topics that may be of interest • Pick a neighbourhood and research its origins, social character, occupational strcutures, built environment,  politics behind development, etc • Based on course materials that will be looked at on Monday • Could be ethnic neighbourhoods, residential ones, shopping centers • Urban renewal in 1960s destroyed many working class communities and rebuilt to something else • 1954 – Properties Standards Board – made compulsory repairs or teardowns o ended up losing many heritage buildings during 50s and 60s • Rockcliffe, Briarwood, Fairview, Prince of Wales Drive (coop development), Veteran subdivisions in Merivale  Road, Carleton Heights by the veterans in Nepean, Rural villages in Ottawa too, some areas under federal  initiatives – Tunney’s pasture complex, Commercial neighbourhoods catering to residents within walking  distance, shopping plazas evolving to big box malls, choice of location to proximities, apartment buildings in  Ottawa, condominiums in Ottawa, Hotels in Ottawa – how this relates this to the changing perception of the  city, trailer park in Bell’s Corners, Ottawa/Nepean Campground and wy the city got involved into running this,  types of businesses that arise around the transportation networks, drive­in theatres which were once common  in Ottawa, how many horses were in Ottawa as transportation as options • lowertown east community association interested in blocks of Rideau Street  o commercial strips – the ownership is often by different corporation  o one side was originally a part of the military site • Kanata – a new development in 1965 o New town with new planning concepts which were expensive and therefore lost it to another  developer o Concerns on the intensification of this area • Beaverbrook to be debated as heritage (in Kanata) o 2300 houses o kinds of people who lived there • Domestic Gothic Architecture • Stone houses in Ottawa • Paper to be worked on throughout the entire term o Some sources are easier to find than others Lecture Topic: Vernacular city vs. Crown city • Conflict of local residents vs. crown Looking at Ottawa’s Origins • Had once been possibelt o walk from one end of Ottawa to the other end • City of Ottawa developed two years before first map – 1857 • John Taylor discuses how the city developed within the frameowkr of the rural system • The pre­exisitng gridded lots by the surveyors of imperial expansion dterniend property ownership • The property development lines are generally 200 – acre farmlots for rural development • Then to impose a city on a rural neighbourhood you need to deal with the owners o Subdivided further o Or someone comes in and does it with them to form a subdivision • Bronson Ave, and others were concession lines initially  • A developer buys up so much land and then petitions to get rid of the roads and make it look like  • Surveying grid remains • Old Bytown – subdivision plan which straddles a major boundary line o Line that runs through the surveying plan (diagonal line on map) • Theme to be highlighted: Town vs. Crown  • He looks generally at the evolution of the city’s economic function, and also the ethnic tensions, particularly  upper and lower town • Also tensions between local peoples, the ‘town’ (vernacular) and the ‘city’ (official status) • Constant tension with arms of government goes back before Ottawa became a capital • Ottawa’s development before 1855 in terms of: o Contrast between antive space and rational enlightenment planning  o Specualative activity vs. Gvoernment and their economic sites o Speculative town of Sherwood vs the defeat by the governor of the day who was promoting a military  town site to the east) o Nicolas Sparks ended up owning a farm south of Wellington Street – lost half of it immediately when  it was expropriated for canal expansion o Battle Between squatters and the crown lands department Native vs. Rational Enlightenment Planning • Early 19  century • Term to use land expropriated by the government from te native that is not yet privatized: wasteland of the  crown o Implies cultural assumption that land isn’t worth anything until exprorpriated by use o They mean that some sue approved by European people  i.e. agriculture, urban use • Also called howling wilderness • Today’s historians may use ‘native space’ as a term • The Attitude fo the British government was dictated by self­interest  • British decided to safeguard their interests by controlling access ot the lands to the interior, so the Roayl  Proclamation in 1673? was issued o Had later significance o Pronounced that lands there belonged to the First Peoples through treaties of the Crown o The Crown would take treaty negotiation and allocate that land to settelrs o Settlers can’t make their own arrangements • Allies recognition with Natives • The Proclamation continued in force even after American Revolution Eastern Upper Canada – most would have said it was mostly unpopulated when Eastern Settlers started coming here • Population of Aboriginal peoples would have been annilated by the Iroquoius wars during the 1600s • Algonquin peoples of the Ottaw valleys dispersed • Most archaeologists now say that there was some occupation  largely undergathered population • Champlain in 1613 • 19  century record that there were still Aboriginals in occupation here and may have continuous occupation  since the time of Champlain • The siginificant is that they were small in number • A number of nomadic bands not numbering more than 120 families throughout the entire Ottawa Valley • They tend to come down every summer to Oka to the west • The British therefore signed the treaty with the Missisauga peoples, not with the ones from Ottawa  (Algonquin?) o These people hunted as far as Perth • British regarded land as seated territory while the Algonquin do not • Algonquin east of Ottawa river claim that Eastern Ontario as part of their traditional hunting ground – remains  contested o Has implications when federal ladns come up for redevelopment – they are crown l
More Less

Related notes for HIST 3209

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit