Class Notes (835,165)
Canada (508,984)
Law (1,967)
LAWS 1000 (529)
Lecture

LAWS 1000 -2

5 Pages
68 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Law
Course
LAWS 1000
Professor
Jane Dickson- Gilmore
Semester
Fall

Description
LAWS­ Jan. 29   th Review: Access to Justice  Great deal of what implicates the justice involves money   Legal aid began through social and political movement to improve the society  [social transformation]   Glathercole, “Legal Services and the Poor”  Two categories of legal aid delivery  Judicare Model: Legal aid should provide poor with same standard of legal  services available to rest of society; replicate for the court same dynamics  as where there will be no lawyer involved  strengths  (client gets to interview the lawyer­ relationships) &  weaknesses (clients don’t know what to look in a lawyer; not cost  efficient, lawyer avalibity and experti)   Confidents of the client to take the lawyer – on the opposite ends of  the social spectrum; state clearly: “this are ‘my’ constructions”   Client is the employer of the lawyer   Legal Services Model: Legal aid should aim for eradication of poverty  Approach of legal problem solving of the social transformation   Legal air clinics, kinds of problems that are seen in everyday life;  getting the community together to ‘fight’ the authority figure of the  community (land­lord)   Employed by the plan, not the client   strengths & weaknesses Ramsay, “Small Claims Courts: A Review”­ started out as ADR courts   most people show up with a lawyer   Intended to provide an alternative to costly litigation for small businesses  and consumers  General characteristics  Comparison of Ontario & Quebec courts Lawyers & Lawyering Readings: Vago & Nelson, Chapter 8; Dodek; Canadian Legal Ethics; Smith, “Who is  Afraid of the Big, Bad Social Constructionists”,  Law Society of Upper Canada, “  The Retention of Women in Private Practice Working Group Report – Executive  Summary; Esau, “Specialization in the Legal Profession” ; Schur, “Styles of Legal  Work”.  Legal Education in Canada  Number of lawyers has grown substantially recently   Historically one learned the law as an apprentice  More than half of law school students are women, but the majority of the work  force is made up if men   Law firms do not tend to support the responsibilities of the caregivers    1950­60s: university­based model ascends   Articling ­ “apprenticeship” component preserved  You simply shadow someone who is teaching   Getting into and out of Law School  GPA   LSAT­ law school admitions test   LSAT’s usefulness questioned  Too many lawyers? Two categories of lawyers, those who article and those who  don’t article  Smith, “...the Unpardonable Whiteness of the Legal Profession”  White, upper middle class, male (don’t’ see representation of other groups of  people)   Have understand the path ways, social, cultural and historical factors  Pathways are somewhat open, racism in society in general and discrimination  within the educational system   The legal profession fails to reflect the makeup of the Canadian population.  Lags behind many other professional fields in this regard.  Necessary to look at the pathways to the practise of law  The legal profession today remains predominantly white.  2001: 3.1% of Ontario lawyers were South Asian (physicians 9.6%, engineers  7%)  1990’s: of 3000+ Bay Street lawyers only about 20 are black  Aboriginals (1973) program of legal studies for aboriginal students   Law societies, law schools, and law firms have undertaken initiatives to address  this but the pace of change appears slow  Several factors have contributed to the current situation: a. Absence of lawyers from racialized groups within law firms • When students get into law school, face challenges when they  actually face the profession  b. Law large firms work in ways that are alienating to these individuals c. Discrimination (both individual and systemic)  • Act in ways that impact other groups in unequal way – discrimination  • Choose to penalize people as they are different  Law school tuition has continually been on the increase – post­secondary  education will increasingly divided between the classes   Cost of law school gone up­ the number of students decreased significantly   If current trends continue, post­secondary education will be increasingly divided  along income lines.   There is a noted intersection between race and income   # of law students of African or Aboriginal descent has markedly declined   Debts of over $70,000 upon leaving law school are not uncommon; nearly twice  as likely for African Canadian students  Clearly, the picture has to change.  Clear leadership by law schools and law firms is required; must be measurable  and have specific timelines (trying to attract more students)   Proportional representation of groups in society   Implications for political, social, and economic reality.   Elevating some racial community up a class  The Retention of Women in Private Practice…
More Less

Related notes for LAWS 1000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit