Class Notes (837,001)
Canada (509,985)
Philosophy (647)
PHIL 2003 (62)
Lecture

Lecture 1.docx

7 Pages
95 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 2003
Professor
David Matheson
Semester
Spring

Description
PHIL 2003­B January 7, 2014 Lecture 1 Why reasonable belief matters Arguments as reasons for belief  Detecting arguments Truth Reasonable beliefs are more likely than unreasonable beliefs to be  true.  ▯Robert Nozick’s experience machine tells us that truth matters to  us, not just experiences/feelings/pleasures Survival Reasonable beliefs promote our survival better than unreasonable  beliefs. Health Reasonable beliefs are psychologically healthier than unreasonable  beliefs, (generally speaking).  ▯Stoics: disabusing yourselves of unreasonable beliefs contributes  to happy, healthy mental states.   Stability Reasonable beliefs are (generally) more psychologically stable  than unreasonable beliefs.   ▯Reasonable beliefs are less likely to be undermined by  countervailing evidence, conflicting opinions.  Responsibility Reasonable beliefs are more characteristic of morally responsible  individuals than unreasonable beliefs.  ▯The more you gravitate towards unreasonable beliefs, the more  you gravitate towards immoral behavior.  Truth and goodness come together when thinking of responsibility.  Ex. The belief that other races/sexes/social groups are inferior to  others (i.e. racism, sexism, elitism) are immoral beliefs.  In critical thinking (and logic), we spend a lot of time thinking  about arguments. How do arguments relate to reasonable belief? A good way to begin to see this is first to get clear that when we  talk about "arguments" in these contexts, we don't mean one of the  things we often ordinarily mean when we talk about "arguments,"  viz., _____________________________________________________ ____________. Rather, we mean:Argument: a set of statements, one of which (at  least) is intended to be supported by the others. 2 Statement: a sentence used to express a thought that can be true  or false. (i.e. a truth valuable sentence) Supported by: made reasonable to be believed by An argument, in this sense, is the expression in language of an  inference, where an inference involves thinking certain thoughts  on the basis of (or because of) other thoughts. (Compare merely  thinking a series of random, disconnected thoughts.) Thus, arguments are the central means whereby we express our  reasons for belief. In an argument, the statements that _____________ are called the  premises of the argument; the statement that ____ is called the  argument's conclusion. Premise: a statement in an argument intended to support one of the  other statements in the argument. .   Conclusion: a statement in an argument intended to be supported  by other statements  in the argument.  Exercise 1.1: Identify the premises and conclusions in the  following arguments. All humans are mortal. And, of course, Xanthippe is human. So  Xanthippe is mortal. As much as I love him, my dog Oakley is not a person. To be a  person, after all, is to possess the capacity for self­consciousness.  And although Oak is a conscious being, he doesn’t possess the  capacity for self­consciousness. The vast majority of social conservatives subscribe to some  organized religion. Since the author is a clearly a social  conservative, he subscribes to an organized religion. If Nigella Lawson is a great food writer, so is Elizabeth David.  Nigella Lawson obviously is a great food writer. Hence, Elizabeth  David is too. Since low­carbohydrate diets are notoriously difficult to maintain,  and since Health Canada recommends eating an ample amount of  daily grains, it’s wise not to jump on the low­carbohydrate diet  bandwagon. Fernando correctly identified the card I drew from the deck. The  best available explanation of this is that he engaged in some  sleight­of­hand that I didn’t notice. So Fernando must have  engaged in some sleight­of­hand that I didn’t notice. Arguments in our sense are different from mere reports. A report  simply presents a set of statements that purport to a; it doesn’t  attempt to  _____________________________________________________ ___________________. Thus, consider the following examples of reports: Yesterday I attended a friend’s thesis defense. It was very  interesting, though a bit nerve­wracking at the same time. All in  all, I was glad I sat in. I learned a lot. "A flurry of polls has shown the race in British Columbia to have  suddenly become much more competitive, as the B.C. Liberals  close the gap between themselves and the B.C. New Democrats to  single digits. But does Christy Clark have enough time to narrow  the gap even further and put herself in a position where she could  be re­elected? "The latest forecast for ThreeHundredEight.com [...] and The  Globe and Mail projects the New Democrats to have the support of  44 per cent of British Columbians, a drop of three points from the  47 per cent the NDP had in polls just prior to last week’s
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 2003

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit