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Lecture 3

PHIL 2102 Week 3 Class 2.docx
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Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 2103
Professor
Jay Drydyk
Semester
Fall

Description
Week 3 Class 2 Moral Guarantee doesn’t mean you absolutely have it, It means it’s wrong to deprive you of it Prudential Arguments: • Plural Form o Doing X is best for all of us, all things considered o So do X • Single form o Doing X is best for you o So do X • Human Rights Application o Recognizing and implementing a human right to X would be best for all of us, all things considered ( fundamental interest o So let’s all recognize and implement a human right to X o So there is human right to X o Logical Gap: premise  Best for us  It’s wrong for anyone to be deprived of a capability to do X Three Uses of Language • Assertive or Descriptive o Saying what is the case, expressing belief o Direction of fit: making our ideas match the world • Directive o Giving directions, telling others or oneself what to do o Direction of fit, making the world match our ideas • Moral o Stating that a directive is independently binding on us o Expresses belief that we ought to do what the directive says, that doing otherwise is wrong o Directive is embedded in assertion:  Murder is wrong = don’t murder is correct and binding on us • Examples: o Judge: Microsoft must cease its monopolistic practices = directive o Reporter: Microsoft has been order to cease its monopolistic practices = descriptive o All persons are to be treated as ends in themselves, never merely as means o Being manipulative is wrong if you want to be valued as a team player o Being manipulative is a character flaws it’s not what good people do = moral Kinds of Moral Premises: • “The right thing to do it …” • “Justice requires that …” • Ideals “virtues” o “What a good person would do is…” o “It’s an excellent thing to … whenever possible” • Values o “…Ought to be maximized” (e.g. human we
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