Class Notes (838,375)
Canada (510,867)
Philosophy (644)
PHIL 2380 (30)
Lecture

Deontology
Premium

3 Pages
82 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 2380
Professor
Deirdre Kelly
Semester
Winter

Description
PHIL 2380 Jan 21 2014 Deontology ­“He who is cruel to animals becomes hard also in his dealings with men. We can judge  the heart of a man by his treatment of animals.” ­Immanuel Kant ­“Both liberty and equality are among the primary pursued by human beings throughout  many centuries; but total liberty for wolves is death to the lambs…” ­Isaiah Berlin ­Deontology ­Opposite of consequentialism ­The study of the nature of duty and obligation ­There are moral principles that moral agents must follow regardless of the  consequences ­Exceptionless ­Does not consider consequences, but instead deals with rules and principles ­Intention ­Did the person intend to or to not follow the rule ­E.g. kids getting into their parents’ gun cabinets ­Kantian Morality ­Kant rejects intrinsically good values ­Will (autonomy) and reason ­A good moral agent is one who is motivated by duty ­Duty is determined by the necessary and universal moral law ­Only autonomous agents have rights ­Kant’s Categorical Imperative ­“Act only on those principles that at the same time you can will to become  universal laws of nature” ­“Act so as to humanity… in every case as an end and never merely as a means” ­Kantian Morality ­Advantages ­Cannot allow for torture or killing innocent people in order to reduce the  crime rate (merely as means) ­Gives values to the individual and provides a basis for human rights ­Disadvantages ­Absolutist ­Every rule always applies without exception ­List of exceptions ­Conflicting duties ­Shouldn’t rules, like not lying, be trumped by human life? ­E.g. Jewish people hiding from Nazis, people lying for  them ­E.g. when you have an obligation not to lie but an  obligation to save lives ­Discounts emotions ­E.g. If you smother baby Hitler in his sleep, you’re treating him  only as a means ­History of Rights ­Discussion of rights was first introduced in 1215 with the Magna Carta ­Under the British Bill of Rights (1689) and the US Bill of Rights (1789) rights  were conferred to non­aristocrats ­E.g. Rights for US citizens of African descent ­Women’s right to vote ­Rights ­Have corresponding duties or obligations ­The agent owes the duty ­The recipient is the one who is owed ­Derivative ­Utilitarian justice ­Non­derivative
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 2380

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit