Class Notes (838,375)
Canada (510,867)
Philosophy (644)
PHIL 2408 (41)
Lecture

Physician Assisted Suicide - Judith Jarvis Thomson (Week 8 - March 6)

3 Pages
135 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 2408
Professor
Vida Panitch
Semester
Winter

Description
PHIL2408 A              March 6, 2014 Week 8 ­  Physician Assisted Suicide: Two Moral Arguments:  Judith Jarvis Thomson 4 types of doctor assisted death cases: 1. Disconnecting cases: at a patient’s request, a doctor shuts off or removes the patient from the  equipment that is keeping him alive 2. Non­connecting cases: a doctor accedes to a patient’s request that life­saving treatment not  be undertaken  3. Drug­providing cases: a doctor accedes to a patient’s request to be given a prescription for a  lethal drug he can take himself 4. Drug­injecting cases: a patient is not capable of taking the legal drug himself and requests  that the doctor inject it. Many people defend 1 and 2 but reject 3 and 4. To do this they appeal to two different moral  arguments.  • Killing vs. Letting die • Intending vs. Foreseeing  There are both bad arguments, as they do not provide a clear defense of 1 and 2, and a clear  rejection of 3 and 4.  1. Killing vs. Letting Die:  Or the Doing/Allowing Distinction • A doctor killing her patient is different than letting her patient die.  • Killing is not permissible, but letting die is. • 3 & 4 are acts of killing, 1 & 2 are acts of letting die.   This is not correct.  1a. Disconnecting/Non­connecting cases (1 and 2)  Non­connection is letting die –nature takes its course. Disconnection is less clear: doctor is removing impediment to nature taking its course   • But so is someone who removes a beam supporting a ceiling – are they really just  allowing gravity to take its course or causing the roof to collapse? • And what if the patient’s enemy disconnects him in the middle of the night? Is that just  letting nature take its course? • And what is the doctor disconnects the patient when the patient has asked not to be  disconnected? ‘Letting die’ occurs only if: 1. Patient dies of underlying medical condition 2. Patient loses what he would have had with the doctor’s help 3. The doctor has been given a right by the patient to take action that results in the patient’s  death.  1b. Drug­providing/Drug­injecting Cases (3 and 4) Drug providing is clearly killing and so is drug injecting? Is this right? Drug­providing:  • But the patient chooses to take it or not, of the patient doesn’t take it has the doctor done  anything wrong?  • If the doctor assists in something bas it is suicide. Suicide isn’t bad (or at least not illegal) so  why should assistance be? Well, drug injecting is surely killing, though, right? Not necessari
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 2408

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit