Class Notes (835,428)
Canada (509,186)
Psychology (2,710)
PSYC 2002 (84)
John Logan (37)
Lecture 2

PSYC 2002 - Week 2.doc

9 Pages
61 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 2002
Professor
John Logan
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC 2002 Introduction to statistics in psychology Winter 2014 Week 2 – January 15/17, 2013 Outline for this week’s classes ■ visual displays of data ■ basic math ■ central tendency ▲mean / median / mode ■ variability ▲ variance / standard deviation Readings ■ displaying data & descriptive statistics" ▲NH pp. 43­68 (Visual displays of data); NH pp. 69­89 (Central tendency and variability) ▲Chapters 3 and 4  Visual displays of data: Graphs ■ graphs can have positive and negative uses ▲ can accurately and succinctly present information ▲ can reveal/conceal complicated data Graphs can mislead ■ Ithaca Times cover December 7, 2000:  “the most misleading graph ever published”  (Friendly, 2010) − no axis − different lengths of times on same graph Graphs can mislead ■ scales over different periods ▲35 vs. 12 years ■ rank actually improves! − low rankings at the top, high rankings at the top Another misleading graph ■ Reuters, Dec 10, 2013 ■ fixed by Jonathan Keller, Dec 11, 2013 ■ original replaced by Reuters − on the left is the misleading graph, while on the right is a more accurate way of representing the data − very different scales for each graph − the original was replaced with the one on the right  Common types of graphs: Scatterplot ■ scatterplot: graph that depicts the relation between two scale variables ▲observing every data point • linear relationships • nonlinear relationships Common types of graphs: Scatterplot Common types of graphs: Line graph Common types of graphs: Bar graph ■ when the independent variable is nominal and the dependent variable is interval ■ Pareto chart: bar graph in which categories along the x­axis are ordered from highest to lowest Common types of graphs: Bar graph Common types of graphs: Bar graph ■ bar graphs can be used to highlight differences between means Choosing a graph based on variables ■ one interval variable: histogram or frequency polygon ■ one interval independent & dependent variable: scatterplot or line graph ■ one nominal independent & one interval dependent variable: bar graph ■ >two nominal independent & one interval dependent variable: bar graph What’s wrong with this graph? − no labels, no x axis, no units, too much “chart junk” Some basic math­related concepts: Statistical notation ■ summation notation = sigma Σ ■ N or n = number of scores, observations, etc. − N ­> population − n ­> sample ■ X, Y = variable names Statistical notation: Example example of statistical notation using Σ ■ mean (aka average) = M ■ M = (X1 + X2 + X3 + … XN)/N           = (ΣX)/N Order of operations in “formulas” ■ statistical “formulas” follow standard rules for the ordering of mathematical operations 1. operations in parentheses 2. squaring 3. multiply/divide 4. add/subtract Significant digits ■ 12/3 = 4 (no remainder) ■ 12/7 = 1.714285714 (remainder!) ▲all the digits to right of decimal are necessary for perfect accuracy ▲however, in practice, only the first three digits past the decimal are typically used (textbook two)  ▲use two significant digits to be consistent with the text Descriptive statistics ■ summary of data using a small set of numbers ▲ middle of distribution (average) ▲ how spread out (variability) Definition of central tendency ■ statistical measure that takes one number as representative of a group ■ economical estimate of the general characteristics of a group ■ three main measures ▲mean ▲median ▲mode Mean ■ mean = arithmetic mean, arithmetic average, or average ■ add all scores; divide sum by number of scores ■ mean = M = ΣX         N Mean: Example ■ grades ▲ Psychology midterm 1 = 63% ▲ Psychology midterm 2 = 72% ▲ Psychology final exam = 73% ■ mean Psychology grade (assume equal weighting of each test) = (63 + 72 + 73)/3 = 208/3 = 69.333% Symbols for mean ■ μ (mu) = population mean ■ (x­bar) = sample mean ■ M = generic mean ▲M is the symbol we will use for the mean in PSYC 2002 X Characteristics of the mean ■ changing a score or adding an additional score will change the mean ■ adding or subtracting a constant will affect the mean by the same amount ■ multiplying or dividing each score by a constant will affect the mean in the same way ■ sensitive to extreme scores: outliers Characteristics of the mean ■ effect of an outlier on value of mean Median: Definition ■ median = score that divides a distribution exactly in half; 50% of scores are above the median and 50% are below Determining the med
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 2002

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit