Class Notes (838,457)
Canada (510,890)
Psychology (2,716)
PSYC 2002 (84)
John Logan (37)
Lecture

PSYC 2002 - Week 1.doc

4 Pages
174 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 2002
Professor
John Logan
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC/NEUR 2002 Introduction to statistics in psychology Winter 2014 Week 1 – January 8/10, 2013 Outline for this week’s classes ■ review course outline ■ introduction to statistics ▲ rationale for statistics ▲basic types of statistics ■ distributions of numbers ■ introduction to Excel Required materials ■ Nolan, S., & Heinzen, T. (2014). Essentials of statistics for the behavioral sciences, 2nd Edition. New York: Worth. ISBN­13: 978­ 1­4641­2008­4 ■ a calculator that is capable of basic mathematical operations, including squareroots ■ access to spreadsheet software that savefiles in Excel format (Excel, Open Office, Libre Office, Numbers, etc.) Readings ■ NH A­1­7 (Appendix A – Reference for basic mathematics)" ■ NH pp. 1­20 (An introduction to statistics and research design)" ■ NH pp. 21­42 (Frequency distributions) Statistics is a research tool for evaluating data ■ data – set of scores or measurements ■ statistics – numerical facts derived from data ■ statistics are used to evaluate the results of experiments; Did the data support the hypothesis? ■ quantify behaviour to enable more precise statements about data and its theoretical implications Kinds of statistics ■ descriptive statistics – summary of measurements (e.g., average) ■ inferential statistics – enable inferences to be drawn from data Systematic versus random effects ■ if two groups show a difference, is the difference attributable to a systematic difference or is the difference attributable to  chance? ■ if the individuals were randomly assigned to the groups then it is possible to choose between these alternatives Generalization ■ would a set of results hold if another group of participants were used? ▲ sample – subset of individuals from a larger group ▲ population – the set of all individuals that have some characteristic Generalization & random sampling ■ generalization from sample topopulation requires a random sample ▲each member of the population has an equal chance of being selected ▲ selection of any one member is independent of the selection of the other members Assumptions of statistics ■ interpretation of statistical information must account for possible violations of assumptions, such as non random assignment,  non random sampling, etc. 1.use appropriate statistics 2.understand how robust a statistic is when its assumptions are violated Scales of measurement ■ type of observations determines appropriate type of statistic ▲nominal scale ▲ordinal scale ▲ interval scale ▲ ratio scale Nominal & ordinal scales 1.nominal scale – observations categorized (e.g., types of professions, political affiliation) 2.ordinal scale – observations rank ordered (e.g., Maclean's ranking of universities, top 200 recordings of 2013) (aka rank­ordered  variable) Interval & ratio scales 3.interval scale – all categories have same size (celsius temperature) 4.ratio scale – interval scale with an absolute zero point (Kelvin temperature, response time, percent correct) Discrete & continuous variables ■ discrete variables – indivisible categories (e.g., number of participants in a condition, number of conditions in an experiment) ■ continuous variables – infinite number of possible values (e.g., time, length) Statistical notation ■ N or n = number of scores, observations, etc. ■ X, Y, Z = variable names Frequency distributions ■ frequency distribution: number of individual scores associated with each category in some type of measurement system;  arguably, simplest type of descriptive statistic ■ goal ­ organize data ▲ scores ranked lowest to highest
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 2002

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit