Class Notes (834,991)
Canada (508,850)
Psychology (2,710)
PSYC 2002 (84)
John Logan (37)
Lecture

PSYC 2002 - Preliminary Inferential Stats.doc

11 Pages
84 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 2002
Professor
John Logan
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC/NEUR 2002 Introduction to statistics in psychology Winter 2014 W­3 Readings ■ Sampling & probability ▲NH pp. 91­114 (Sampling & probability) ■ Normal curve and standardized scores ▲NH pp. 115­144 (The normal curve, standardization, and z scores) Outline: Preliminaries to inferential statistics ■ relation of probability to random sampling ■ inferential statistics & hypothesis testing ■ probability and frequency distributions ■ normal distribution ■ Z­scores Samples and their populations ■ decision making ▲ the risks and rewards of sampling • 2000 US presidential election; Florida vote count  • TV networks use of common sample poll Sampling: Risks ■ sample might not represent the larger population ■ may not know that the sample is misleading ■ possibility of inaccurate conclusions ■ might make decisions based on this inaccurate information Sampling: Rewards ■ the sample represents the larger population ■ increase level of confidence in findings ■ reach accurate conclusions at low cost ■ remain open­minded because we know samples can mislead us ■ better decisions based on the available evidence Types of sampling ■ random sampling ■ convenience sampling ▲ volunteer sample ­ most often convenience sampling is used Random Sample ■ every member of the populations has an equal chance of being selected into the study Random Sample ■ ideal, but... ▲expensive and potentially impossible to implement Convenience sample ■ a sample that uses participants who are readily available ▲used in most psychological studies ▲volunteer sample: subtype of convenience sample in which participants actively choose to  participate in a study Random sampling vs random assignment ■ random assignment: all participants have an equal chance of being assigned to a condition Probability ■ probability is the key that links samples and populations ■ rules of probability are used to test hypotheses Why probability? samples and populations ■ a sample is a subset of a population that is likely to maintain characteristics of the population ■ a probabilistic relationship exists between a sample and the population from which the sample was obtained Types of probability ■ personal probability: a probability judgement based on an individual’s opinion (aka subjective probability) ■ expected relative­frequency probability: likelihood of an event occurring based on the actual outcome of a large  number of trials Probability Quiz ■ “She’s has been playing that slot machine without success for two hours and she just quit; let’s play that one—it’s going to  pay off soon.” ■ “My next­door neighbour has three boys and she’s pregnant again. This one is bound to be a girl.” Probability & independence ■ gambler’s fallacy: mistaken notion that the probability of particular event changes with a long string of the same event Probability ■ probability is not certainty (unless the probability or ratio is 1 or 0, which are very rare) ■ probabilities are long­run patterns, not guarantees of what will happen Probability example ■ population = 20 red marbles + 80 blue marbles ■ sample of one marble from population is more likely to be a blue marble because there are   marbles in the population ■ however, this cannot be guaranteed Probability example why? ■ because the sample is selected from a population containing some red marbles, it cannot be guaranteed that the marble  sample will be blue ■ this is where probability becomes important… Probability & uncertainty ■ some element of uncertainty is associated with the relationship between sample characteristics and population characteristics Probability & inferential statistics inferential statistics ■ in research the goal is to make inferences about a population from what is observed in a sample; this process is known as  inferential statistics Probability & inference making example ■ consider two jars of marbles ▲ jar 1 = 20 red & 80 blue marbles ▲ jar 2 = 80 red & 20 blue marbles ■ if a sample of 10 marbles is drawn from one of the jars and it contains 10 blue marbles, what jar did the sample come from? Probability & inference making ■ although both jars contain blue marbles, jar 1 has a much greater proportion of blue marbles; ■ therefore, it’s more likely that the sample came from jar 1 (it’s also possible, but much less likely, that the sample came from  the second jar) ■ a sample can be used to make an inference about a population Probability & inference making ■ the figure below illustrates the relationship between a population and a sample Population Probability Sample Inferential statistics Calculation of probability ■ probability can be defined in terms of a proportion of the total number of outcomes that are possible Calculation of probability: Examples example 1 ■ a coin has two sides ▲a head (H) ▲a tail (T) ■ H + T = 2 outcomes Calculation of probability: Examples ■ however, on a single toss of the coin, only one side of the coin can face upright ■ therefore, probability of a head on a single toss of the coin is ó or 0.5 (or 50%) ■ similarly, the probability of a tail on a single toss of the coin is ó or 0.5 (or 50%) Calculation of probability: Examples example 2 ■ standard deck of playing cards contains 52 cards = 52 outcomes ■ if a single card is selected from the deck, such as the two of spades (only one card is the two of spades), the probability of  selecting that specific card is 1/52 or 0.0192 (or 1.92%) Calculation of probability: Examples example 3 ■ how likely is an ace to be selected from a deck of 52 cards? ■ 4 aces in deck of cards ■ probability of selecting an ace = 4/52 or 0.0769 (or 7.69%) Definition of probability – formula ■ in general the formula for deriving probabilities is given by  Probability of A =    number of cases classified as A        total number of possible outcomes all probability values range from 0/1 to 1/1 (0 to 1.0; 0% to 100%) Relation of probability to random sampling ■ definition of probability requires that outcomes be defined by random sampling Relation of probability to random sampling ■ definition of random sampling 1. each individual in population must have equal chance of being selected 2. if more than one individual selected, different individuals must have the same probability  of  being  selected Relation of probability to random sampling expansion of definition ■ must be no bias in selection process ■ probability of selecting individuals can be combined to determine probability of selecting groups (e.g., pick any card =1/52;  pick an ace = 4/52) Inferential statistics ■ probability links the two branches of statistics: descriptive and inferential ▲descriptive statistics provide a description of a sample ▲probability allows the descriptive statistics of the sample to be linked to the characteristics of  the population Inferential statistics: Hypothesis testing ■ the most commonly used method in inferential statistics is hypothesis testing ▲ requires hypotheses to test... Developing hypotheses ■ null hypothesis: no difference between conditions ■ research hypothesis: there is a difference between conditions ■ control group: does not receive the treatment ■ experimental group: receive the treatment Making a decision about hypotheses ■ reject the null hypothesis ▲ conclude that you found a difference ■ fail to reject the null hypothesis ▲ conclude that you did not find a difference Type I and Type II Errors ■ statistical inferences can be wrong ▲Type I errors: rejecting the null hypothesis when it is true (in other words, saying  that  something happened  when it didn’t) ▲Type II errors: failing to reject the null hypothesis when it is false (in other words,  saying  that something didn’t  happen when it did) Type I and Type II Errors ■ example: pregnancy test Relation of probability to frequency distributions ■ a population can be represented in graphical format as a plot of score frequencies ■ because an area on a graph corresponds to a proportion of the total population, & proportions can be equated with  probabilities, a frequency distribution can be used to plot probabilities Relation of probability to frequency distributions ■ ten scores; number of scores > 4 is two (one score = 5 & one score = 6) ■ proportion of scores > 4 = 2/10 or 0.2 Relation of probability to frequency distributions ■ proportion of scores > 4 = 2/10 or 0.2 ■ this can be translated into probabilities: p(X > 4) = 2/10 or 0.2 Probability and the normal distribution ■ same basic procedure outlined for graph of a frequency distribution can be applied to the normal distribution Probability and the normal distribution: History ■ Abraham de Moivre (1667­1754) Probability and the normal distribution: History ■ normal distribution: in graphical form  Daniel Bernoulli (1769): Frequency of Errors  Augustus de Morgan (1849) Probability and the normal distribution ■ definition of normal distribution ▲symmetrical ▲mean = median = mode ▲generally, most scores are in mid
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 2002

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit