Class Notes (838,359)
Canada (510,864)
Psychology (2,716)
PSYC 2002 (84)
John Logan (37)
Lecture

PSYC 2002 - Correlation & Regression.doc

7 Pages
92 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 2002
Professor
John Logan
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC/NEUR 2002 Introduction to statistics in psychology Winter 2014 Week 11 Lecture outline: Correlation ■ bivariate versus univariate data ■ correlation and regression ■ measurement of correlation: Pearson product­moment correlation ■ interpretation of correlation coefficient ■ factors that affect the correlation coefficient Lecture outline: Regression ■ regression as prediction ■ relationship between correlation and regression ■ conceptual basis of regression ■ regression lines on scatterplots ■ multiple regression Readings ■ Correlation & regression ▲NH pp. 343­368 (Correlation) ▲NH pp. 369­402 (Regression) Bivariate vs. univariate data ■ univariate data: data from only one variable ■ bivariate data: data from two variables many questions in psychology focus on the relationship between two variables Bivariate vs. univariate statistics ■ statistical procedures used with bivariate data are analogous to those used with univariate data ▲bivariate descriptive statistics ▲bivariate inferential statistics ■ correlation (measure of relation) ■ regression (prediction) Correlation definition of correlation: measure of the degree of linear relationship between two variables ■ direction of relationship: positive vs. negative ■ degree of relationship: strong vs. weak (Linear) Regression definition of regression: how well can variation in one variable predict linear variation in another variable? ■ if we know a value for X, can we predict what the corresponding value of Y will be? ■ example: Does knowing how many hours a person studies predict final exam grades? Does lots of study predict higher grades? How to quantify correlation 1 ■ what kind of procedure can be used to evaluate bivariate (X/Y) data? ■ one possibility... ▲ calculate the deviation scores between the mean and each score for each variable; is a score above  or below  average? How to quantify correlation 2 ▲multiply X­deviations by Ydeviations ▲ signs (i.e., + or ­) of the products indicate whether both deviations are in the same direction or not How to quantify correlation 3 ■ example ▲ two “positive” scores or two “negative scores = positive product = values for each variable are “moving” in the same  direction  ▲one positive and one negative score = negative product = variables “moving” in different directions ■ determine average product of deviation scores = covariance ■ covariance is a measure of the extent to which two variables vary together as a group How to quantify correlation: Interpretation of covariance ■ if products are consistently positive, covariance = positive ■ if products are consistently negative, covariance = negative ■ if products vary between positive and negative, then covariance = close to zero How to quantify correlation: Problem with covariance ■ although it is useful to know the direction of the relationship, the size of the covariance value is not easily interpretable because  it’s dependent, in part, on the units of measurement used. ■ solution: use Z­scores ■ standardize scores to eliminate problem of unit size ■ covariance of Z­scores: ▲ correlation coefficient = r Pearson product moment correlation: Limits ■ when this procedure is used, the measure of correlation is restricted to values between +1 and ­1 Formula for Pearson product moment correlation ■ putting together the concept of covariance and Z­scores yields the following formula: r =  Σ  X Y Z         N Formula for Pearson product moment correlation • r = abbreviation for correlation coefficient ! • Σ ZX Y = sum of Zscore cross­products ! • N = number of X­Y pairs Revised formula for Pearson product moment correlation ■ the Z­score version of the formula is computationally challenging to use ▲Z­scores for each X­Y pair need to be computed ■ an alternative (but algebraically equivalent) formula is often used r =  Σ   [(X­M  )(Y­M )] x y         sqrt(Sx SSy) Revised formula for Pearson product moment correlation ■ revised formula is a ratio of the covariability of X and Y together (numerator) and the variability of X and Y separately  (denominator)r = Example of correlation coefficient calculation ■ correlation between degree of psychopathy and ability to identify the emotion present in spoken sentences ■ for each person, two measurements ▲degree of psychopathy (0­20; 0 = no psychopathy, 20 = max); PS ▲mean emotion identification accuracy (0­100%); EA ■ 10 participants (N = 10)  Correlation coefficient calculation: Order of calculations 1.numerator: sum products of deviations for X and for Y 2.denominator: square root of product of SS values for X and Y Correlation coefficient: Combine components in r formula ■ CP = Σ[(X ­ MX)(X ­ MY) = ­796.8 ■ SSX = 240.1 ■ SSY = 2858.4 r = ­0.962 Correlation coefficient: Excel function ■ correl(array1,array2) ▲array1 is the set of X values ▲array2 is the set of Y values Interpretation of correlation coefficient ■ in psychopath/emotion study, r = ­.96 ■ what does this mean? Hypothesis testing with the correlation coefficient ■the same basic 4­step procedure used with univariate data can be used with bivariate data 1. generate hypotheses 2. determine critical value 3. calculate test statistic 4. evaluate test statistic with critical value Hypothesis testing with the correlation coefficient: Step 1 ■ H0: r = 0 ■ no linear relationship exists between the two variables ■ H1: r ≠ 0 ■ a linear relationship does exist between the two variables ■ directional hypotheses are also possible; however, we will only do 2­ tailed tests with r  Hypothesis testing with the correlation coefficient: Step 2 & 3 ■ critical value for r ■ dfr = N ­ 2 ■ Table B.6 The Pearson Correlation Coefficient ▲ for psychopathy/emotion study, df = 10 ­ 2 = 8; for α = .05 for a 2­tailed test, rcritical = ±.632 ■ calculate robtained = ­.962 Hypothesis testing with the correlation coefficient: Step 4 ■ compare robtained & rcritical ▲ ­.962 exceeds ­.632, reject H0 ■ concluding statement: “Higher psychopathy scores were associated with reduced accuracy for identifying emotion in spoken  sentences, r = ­.962, p 
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 2002

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit