Class Notes (836,136)
Canada (509,645)
Psychology (2,710)
PSYC 2500 (213)
Lecture

Psyc 2500: Language, Speech

4 Pages
71 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 2500
Professor
Monique Senechal
Semester
Fall

Description
PSYC 2500 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY LECTURE # LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT Elements of Language 3 dimensions of language: ­ Form: structure of the output and the input ­ Content: the meaning behind the verbal stream ­ Function: how language is used to communicate  ­ Until recently, all 3 facets of language have been studied independently of one another, and are now started  to be looked at together in studies ­ Typically in our society, someone speaks while the other person listens, and once there is a pause we know it  as a cue to reply Components of Form Phonology: the sound structures of language, and the rules of the organization of the sound structures. Certain  combinations of sounds are allowed and others are not. This also refers to the smallest unit or sound that can be  distinguished and this is called a phoneme. In the English language there are about 44 different phonemes that we can  distinguish. Infants are born with the capacity to distinguish many more phonemes than are actually present within their  language. We seem to be hardwired to distinguish sound structure. A 6­month­old Japanese speaker can distinguish  between more specific phonemes than adult Japanese speakers. The ability to distinguish certain phonemes  disappears around age 8 months – 12 months. The synapses for the phonemes that are not valid in the primary  language are pruned.  Morphology: the combination of units of speech, parts of words and how we put parts of words together. A  morpheme is the smallest component of a word that has psychological meaning. I.e. baseball – has 2 morphemes in it:  base and ball (is a compound word and made of 2 separate words/morphemes). Cat is a single morpheme and then  adding the morpheme “s” making cat plural indicates to us there is more than 1 cat. If the word is the present tense (i.e.  dance) and then turn it into the past tense (i.e. danced) “ed” becomes a morpheme that helps us to put the term into  the past. The addition of “ing” to a word to make it ongoing is a morpheme (i.e. dancing). Possible is one morpheme  and then turning the word into “impossible” now has 2 morphemes. Children who are more aware of the morphology in  the language seem to be better at doing certain tasks. Chinese children who have a better understanding of the  morphemes seem to be able to read better. In the French language children who have a better of the morphology seem  able to capture the morphology better in their writing. If children gather more and more words in their vocabulary they  start to see more redundancies in new words and can make new links.  Syntax: the rules to combine words within sentences. We need rules because not all languages do the same  combinations of words within sentences. In the English language qualifiers go in front of the noun (i.e. the red truck).  Compared to French, the qualifiers are applied after the noun (i.e. camion rouge).  Components of Content – how do children learn the meaning of words? Semantics: the meaning behind the word and the meaning of the language. Most of the work done in this stage is  based on the number of words a child can either produce or recognize. If presenting a child with a word and then a  selection of pictures, can they understand the meaning of the word and select the correct picture to correspond? Components of Function Pragmatics: the situational use of language and the social cues surrounding language. There are certain rules  surrounding how and what you would say when interacting with different individuals. For example, when speaking with  your professor you would not usually say “hey there” when addressing them in an email, but would usually be more  formal. Pragmatics can be considered adaptive (i.e. using “please” and “thank you” usually gets your further when  speaking with someone). Pragmatics is the least studied area of language. Children with autism and Asperger’s tend to  struggle more with pragmatics.  Perceiving Speech ­ 6 month olds are universal language learners, and by 2 months this function is lost because children start to  specialize in one language, which becomes their primary language ­ Babies raised in a 2­language household with equal input from both languages, the child will most likely  retain both languages. If one language dominates the other the other language, children will most likely have  to relearn the non­dominant language. ­ When we talk to babies, babies start to take that and find redundancies in things that are said in them (i.e.  the combination of the consonants “s” and “t” – it is less frequent at the end of a word and babies can start to  piece together the redundancy of “st” at the beginning of a word).  ­ We speak in infant directed speech (“parentese”)– when interacting with an infant, changing the way we  speak. In turn by changing the way we speak it can change the way babies perceive speech.  ­ Infant directed speech can be characterized by speaking in elongating vowels, shortening consonants, and  speaking high pitched. ­ Speaking to infants in “parentese” attracts their attention Milestones in Speech ­ Cooing: up to 6 months and the babies are making vowel sounds.  ­ Babbling: from 6­12 months the babies are making vowels sounds with the addition of consonant sounds. ­ Intonation: occurs at 8 months old and start to vary the sounds they make ­ Even profoundly deaf babies with coo and babble, but decreases with time because they don’t have any  auditory feedback ­ Certain sounds are easier to produce in babbling, including “dadadada” “babababa” and “mamamama”. This  is a case in point where we make things easier for the babies and we name ourselves after the sounds that  they make. ­ The first word usually occurs around the first birthday – this is a demonstration that words are symbols that  stand for something ­ Babbling continues with the presence of the first word ­ By 15­18 months of age, the average number of words that a child can produce is 50 words ­ Around 18 months of age, ther
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 2500

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit