PSYC 3403 Lecture Notes - Eye Movement, Major Trauma, Half-Life

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29 Jan 2013
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Eating disorders and substance abuse
Anorexia nervosa
There are 2 types of anorexia nervosa, the restricting type who simply
restrict their caloric intake and the binge eating purging type who purge the
food they eat through vomiting and laxatives.
Bulimia nervosa
There are 2 types of bulimia, the purging type who consume too many
calories and then purge them and the non-purging type who do not purge.
Bulimic people tend to overeat and are comforted by eating. This behavior
appears to be about losing control through eating and gaining control
through purging. They also tend to be impulsive about shopping and sex.
Bulimic people tend to maintain a normal body weight
Binge eating
Associated with obesity
No purging behavior
Pica
Eating non-edible items
Rumination
This is where you consume a normal amount of food, vomit it back up, and
then eat it again.
Pro ana/pro mia refers to subcultures that view anorexia and bulimia in a positive
light.
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Statistics
55% of people experiencing an eating disorder will also experience a
substance abuse “concern”
12-18 percent of people with anorexia nervosa will experience s substance
abuse “concern”
30-37 of bulimics will experience a substance abuse “concern”
Anorexia nervosa affects women more than men (90-95%)
Anorexia is strongly associated with bulimic symptomatology. That is,
anorexia and bulimia share some of the same symptoms.
Both disorders are characterized by a desire to get rid of food after eating.
People with anorexia are more likely to use legal drugs as opposed to illegal
drugs. They are not big risk takers.
Bulimic men are more likely to be uncomfortable with their sexualities.
Bulimic Eating Disorder and substance abuse disorders
Substance abuse among bulimics is more common in women (2% or general pop)
Their drugs of choice are cigarettes, alcohol, street drugs
Unlike people with anorexia, they do not tend to use laxatives and diet pills
Treatment matching
For bulimia nervosa
Supportive, expressive psychodynamic therapy (non-directive manner)
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (think change act)
Interpersonal therapy (fix the inside first)
For Anorexia nervosa
Hospitalization
Behavioral therapy
Cognitive/support-expressive techniques
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Traumatic brain injury and substance
abuse
TBI is characterized by an external force injury to the brain. TBIs can be either
closed (skull is not penetrated) or open (skull is penetrated).
Degrees of TBI
Mild
Less than 10 minute loss of consciousness
Moderate-
10 minutes to 6 hours of loss of consciousness
Severe
Over 6 hours of loss of consciousness
Gender differences
Men are more likely to suffer TBI past adolescence. Probably due to increased
aggression, workplace hazards, etc.
Phineas gage
Before his injury to his prefrontal cortex, he was a nice guy, after he had a rod forced
through his prefrontal cortex; he turned into a total dick. (That’s the scientific term)
Behavioral symptoms of TBIs
Irratibility
Impulsiveness
Lack of control over violent behavior
Poor social judgement
Symptoms depend on location of injury
Cognitive symptoms
Trouble concentrating
Memory
Learning impairment
Trouble with abstract thinking
Cognitive symptoms are dependent on the location of the brain damaged
Symptoms might also affect developmental stages
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