PAPM2000 March 11, 2013.docx
Premium

4 Pages
46 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Public Affairs and Policy Management
Course
PAPM 2000
Professor
Graeme Auld
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture 6: Participatory Evaluation Overview • Participatory evaluation • Foundations in Participatory research What this is How it is done • Participatory evaluation in practice • Case study • Exercise (maybe) Participatory Evaluation • A different approach to evaluation Builds from participatory research and participatory action research, both which are popular in  development studies • Rooted in a different idea of the role of evaluation Participation of those affected by program can create knowledge, empowerment and ultimately  improve their situation Foundation in Participatory research • The aim is to have generation of knowledge through the process itself • Process as important as the end Different Epistemology • Positivism • Aims are to explain and predict • Diff flavours of positivism, but grounded in idea that empirical world only understandable through  observation and experimentation • Mostly deductive, theory testing • Assumed subject/ object, research, researched distinction • Which policy theory does this appear to inform? • More rational actor model, basis of how we think about policy is very much apparent in this  approach to policy Implications of positivism  • What are the implications of a positivist frame of reference for evaluation? • Consequences of kinds of knowledge that may not be readily integrated in that approach? Social policy that requires large amounts of society to change over time= hard to measure in short  run Makes certain expertise more valuable/ influential Directs our attention to what is measurable rather than toward what is important Instrumental Knowledge • Understanding of properties of an objective world in order to be able to control it Product of natural science perspective • Critiqued from social science perspective because people gain knowledge through action and  interaction Once a social theory exists, it transforms the subjects such that they are no longer the same  (problem of temporal validity) • Instrumental knowledge cannot answer the values question Challenge of going from “what is” to “what one ought to do” Climate Change example • If we accept that the emission of anthropogenic greenhouse gases are driving changes in the  climate system: What does this mean for policy? Does this tell us what our goal should be? Does it tell us how and whether we should solve the problem? Types of Knowledge • Interactive knowledge: Derives from interaction with others • Critical knowledge: Understanding/ awareness of the structural cause of chall
More Less

Related notes for PAPM 2000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit