Class Notes (839,561)
Canada (511,396)
Sociology (1,064)
SOCI 1002 (204)
Lecture

March 21, Sociology of the Family.docx

5 Pages
70 Views

Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOCI 1002
Professor
Christian Carron

This preview shows pages 1 and half of page 2. Sign up to view the full 5 pages of the document.
Description
Sociology of the Family Sociology of Knowledge of Family - Concepts are a combination of ideas and words. They are clusters of cases that allow to distinguish two things from each other. - We can keep a concept narrow or specific or we can expand it to include many things (i.e. Culture, class, race, gender, mass media, the body, technology, religion, education) - Concepts are the result of the question: what is x? Like what is a family? - Not all definitions are equal –> issues of power - Typologies are classification schemes that allow us to distinguish between several types of something, like concepts - Typologies can be two type-typologies, like binaries or they can be more complex typologies which include three types or more (i.e. Social movements, organizations, democracies, or like the family today) - Typologies are the result of the question: what are the different types of x? Like what are the different types of families? Decline of Traditional Nuclear Family - Concern expressed by some about decline of nuclear family, which consists of cohabiting man and woman who maintain socially approved sexual relationship and have at least one child - Traditional nuclear family ð Family in which wife works without pay in home, while husband works outside home for money (making him primary provider) • Has been decrease in traditional nuclear families since 1940s and increasing prevalence of new family forms Power and Families: Love and Mate Selection - Is mistaken assumption that love has been historical basis of marriage • Historically, marriages arranged by third parties who wished to maximize family’s prestige, economic benefits, and political advantages th - Love as important factor in choice of marriage partner first gained currency in 18 - century England with rise of liberalism and individualism - Today’s close connection between love and marriage emerged in early 20 century with rise of self-gratification promoted by Hollywood and advertising Marital Satisfaction - Marital stability rooted more today in marital satisfaction than in usefulness of marriage • Increase in importance of marital satisfaction connected to autonomy of women (now freer to leave unhappy marriages), which has increased because of: i. Legalization of birth control measures ii. Increased presence in paid labor force Social Roots of Marital Satisfaction - Are five sets of social forces underlying marital satisfaction: 1. Economic factors ð Poverty and attendant financial stresses reduce marital satisfaction 2. Divorce laws ð When people are free to end unhappy marriages and remarry, average level of happiness increases among married people 3. Family life cycle ð Presence of children and attendant emotional and financial strain reduce marital satisfaction… 4. Housework and childcare ð Inequitable distribution of domestic responsibilities reduces marital satisfaction 5. Sex: Sexually compatible partners increase marital satisfaction - Low marital satisfaction more likely to lead to divorce Social Movement and Divorce - Prior to 1968: Only grounds for divorce was adultery - Divorce Act of 1968: Expanded grounds for divorce - 1985:Amendments to Divorce Act allowed for divorce if: i. Spouses had lived apart for one year ii. One spouse had committed act of adultery iii. One spouse had treated the other with mental or physical cruelty - Today: No grounds needed to obtain divorce • Impact:Approximately 38% of marriages can now be expected to end in divorce (based on 2003 divorce rates) Social Movement and Reproductiv
More Less
Unlock Document

Only pages 1 and half of page 2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit