Class Notes (838,671)
Canada (511,033)
Sociology (1,064)
SOCI 3710 (4)
Lecture

Lecture 03

5 Pages
52 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCI 3710
Professor
Michael Mopas
Semester
Winter

Description
SOCI 3710: Economic Critiques – January 20, 2014                                             Lecture  03 Lecture Outline • Why do we buy? Looking at producers as the drivers of consumer wants • Different takes:  o Adorno and Horkheimer  o John Kenneth Galbraith  o Betty Friedan  o Stuart Ewen • What do these critics have in common? Capitalism Needs Consumers • What drives consumer culture: Consumers or producers (e.g., corporations,  advertisers, etc.)? • Throughout the middle of the 20th century, the theme of corporate influence was  dominant • Readings assigned this week reflect some of the pioneering work in this area. Adorno and Horkheimer • Members of the Frankfurt School (with others like Walter Benjamin and Herbert  Marcuse) • Predicted the ‘dumbing down’ of art and culture, the concentration of cultural  producers, and the spread of an entertainment society • Builds on the work of Marx to focus on the culture of capitalism • Key argument: The objectification of labour requires the objectification of the  consumer; employers’ need for objectified and submissive workers created a  parallel need for dominated passive consumers False Consciousness • A & H assume that people have true needs to be creative, independent, and  autonomous • However, these true needs cannot be realized in modern capitalism (creativity,  independence, and autonomy are incompatible with the deskilling and  repetitiveness of mass production) • Instead, we are fed false needs – a false consciousness – which allows capitalism  to survive by hiding the oppression of the masses • Culture (i.e., art, music, literature, film) is no longer vibrant, demanding, and  intellectually challenging... becomes banal, predictable and entertaining The Culture Industry • The culture ‘industry’ cultivates FALSE NEEDS • Ensures the creation and satisfaction of false needs and the suppression of true  needs • Shapes the tastes and preferences of the masses SOCI 3710: Economic Critiques – January 20, 2014                                             Lecture  03 • All aspects of popular culture – movies, radio, magazines – pacify consumers and  lull them into accepting their conditions Producing Cultural Products • Culture industry produces goods to manipulate the masses into passivity • Pleasures made available through consumption of popular culture makes people  docile • Cultural production is a process of STANDARDIZATION, while still conferring a  sense of individuality • Products marked by homogeneity and predictability • Reinforces a corrupting and manipulative ideology; conformist and mind­ numbing • Discourages the masses from thinking beyond the confines of the present Culture as Commodities • Culture becomes a commodity that can be bought and sold • Example of music as commodity for mass consumption •  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FktWXipU6HU  Adorno on Popular Music 1. Music is standardized:  • Mechanical • Characterized by a core structure with parts that are interchangeable (unlike  ‘serious’ music, i.e., classical) • Pseudo­individualization (incidental differences used as signs of supposed  uniqueness) • Does not allow for critique, originality, authenticity or intellectual stimulation • Example: Axis of Awesome – Four Chord Songs:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pidokakU4I 2. Popular music promotes passive listening • ‘Whereas serious music (e.g., Beethoven) plays to the pleasure of the  imagination, offering an engagement with the world as it could be, popular  music is the ‘non­productive’ correlate to life in the office or on the factory  floor’ • Satisfies craving for stimulation • Endlessly repetitive, confirming the world as it is 3. Popular music operates as ‘social cement’ • Dissuades peoples from resisting the capitalist system • Listeners are distracted from the demands of reality by entertainment, which  does not demand much attention Manifests in two major types of mass  behaviour: the ‘rhythmically obedient type’ and the ‘emotional type’ SOCI 3710: Economic Critiques – January 20, 2014                                             Lecture  03 For Adorno, one of the few challenges to the culture industry comes from ‘serious  music’ which renounces the commodity form The ‘Dependence Effect’ • John Kenneth Galbraith (1908­2006)  • Criticizes neoclassical economic theories that assume customer sovereignty in the  market • Challenges conventional wisdom that consumers create demand for a product  • Argues that production creates wants by stressing: o Emulation (‘one man’s [sic.] consumption becomes his neighbour’s wish’) o Modern society’s goal to attain a higher standard of living (because of the  constant production of newer and higher standard commodities, we need  to continue to buy more things to ‘keep up’ and maintain our status) Galbraith’s thesis • Modern capitalism dominated by large enterprises and corporations • Characterized by an abundance of constructed wants that are the product of  corporate planning and massive advertising • Producers decide what shall be produced and then mould consumers’ tastes so that  they buy these products • The ‘dependen
More Less

Related notes for SOCI 3710

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit