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Lecture 4

SOWK 3206 Lecture 4: Class 4 – Lecture Notes

2 Pages
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Department
Social Work
Course Code
SOWK 3206
Professor
Joan Kuyek

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Description
Class 4 Lecture Notes In what key ways did the stories from Sudbury and from the Dweyer reading help people reclaim power and agency? Power of collectiveness Inclusion of all groups Diversity Video Presentation Major industry is INCO Conjectural Moments 3 streams came together for the project 1990: o demands for prevention from child specialists and communities in the province o Ontario public serveants working to develop a program within the system o Community indigineus and welfare activism (Sudbury history of housing, welfare reform NSwakamok alternative school) Project leadership from NSwokama Understanding that all aspects of life were related Leaders invited from local low-income community from the begging Understanding of colonial practices Using medicine wheel approach (balance, 4 directions, holistic) Getting Started - Working on the vision and early structure - Dealing with the Provincial funder - Identifying the Donovan and Flour Mill leaders - Hiring staff - Working with the Research team - The ability to block consensus was important Approach - The community was defined geographically - We worked to build community through creation of social capital, active role fro participants, acknowledging and strengthening mutual aid and interdependence, enabling community control through organizational development - Shared funding with broad number of community people - Many differed CD approaches. Community to empower itself Through the governable structure the methodology, local hiring ect, community leaser wer able to participate and shape what they needed and wanted An understanding by the organizers that there were root causes for the problems in the neighbourhood Reclaiming the economy Local employment Student placements Advocacy with welfare and housing issues
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