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Lecture 10

PSYC 250 Lecture Notes - Lecture 10: Robert Sternberg, Storge, John Alan LeePremium

5 pages46 viewsSpring 2018

Department
PSYC
Course Code
PSYC 250
Professor
Sara Radtke
Lecture
10

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Love and Intimacy
Chapter 12
DAVID BUSS
What Is Love?
- When people love each other, they experience less stress in their lives, stronger
immune systems, and better overall health
Love in Other Times and Places
- The Middle Ages glorified the modern idea of romantic love
- Throughout most of Western history, marriage was entered into for economic
reasons and arranged by the parents
- The 19th century brought the idea that romantic love was the most wanted form
of a love relationship
Romantic Love
- Idealized love based on romance and perfection
Unrequited Love
- Loving another when the love will never be returned
Forms and Measures of Love- Romantic vs Companionate Love
Romantic Love
- Passionate love that includes sexual desire, physical attraction, and elation
Companionate Love
- Conjugal love
- Deep affection, attachment, intimacy, trust, loyalty
The Colours of Love: John Alan Lee
- Lee’s research identified six basic ways to love
1. Eros: The Romantic Lover
2. Ludus: The Game-Playing Lover
3. Storge: The Quiet, Calm Lover
4. Mania: The Crazy Lover
5. Pragma: The Practical Lover
6. Agape: The Selfless Lover
Love Triangles: Robert Sternberg
- Sternberg’s triangular theory of love: passion, intimacy, and commitment
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Can We Measure Love?
- Scales have been developed to measure love
- Measure something strongly associated with love
- Attachment (Rubim 1970, 1973)
- Measure aspects of relationships
- Relationship Rating Scale
- Passionate Love Scale
- Most scales measure romantic, not companionate, love.
Origins of Love: Behavioural Reinforcement Theories
- We love because another person reinforces positive feeling in ourselves
- A positive/rewarding feeling in the presence of another makes us like them
- Love is a result of many mutually reinforcement activities with a person
Behaviour reinforcement theories suggest that people love other people they associate
with feeling good. Love for other people grows out of doing things together that are
mutually reinforcing
Cognitive Theories and Evolutionary Theory
Cognitive Theories
- Behaviour occurs and then we interpret it as love
- If we think someone likes us, we are more prone to find them attractive
Evolutionary Theory
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