Class Notes (836,147)
Canada (509,656)
Lecture

World Cultures February 12.docx

6 Pages
101 Views
Unlock Document

Department
anthropology
Course
Anthropology 1034
Professor
Hollis Moore
Semester
Winter

Description
World Cultures February 12, 2014 Ethnocentric Fallacy • If we condemn or reject the beliefs or behaviours of others based on the mistaken  notion that beliefs and behaviours of other cultures can be judged from the  perspective of one’s own culture. Ethnocentrism • Tendency to judge beliefs and behaviours of other cultures from the perspective of  one’s own culture • Using the practices of your own ‘people’ as a yardstick to measure how well the  customs measure up Cultural Relativism • The attempt to understand the beliefs and behaviours of other cultures in terms of  the culture in which they are found • No behaviour or belief can be judged to be odd or wrong simply because it is  different from out own • We must try to understand or beliefs for the purpose of FUNCTION, or meaning  they have to people in the societies in which we find them Relativistic Fallacy ( moral relativism) • The idea that it is impossible to make moral judgements about the beliefs and  behaviours of members of other cultures Lack of a state, lack of sophisticated technology, lack of religion In the early 20  century it was not clear that all humans were equal Phenomenon of human zoos  ▯people from newly colonized tribes were sent to Paris or  New York City in zoos Colonnial Encounter  ▯giving credence to the belief that whites are superior Difference does not mean inferiority A culture could not be understood until seen from the point of view of the Natives. Set out to destroy cultures and customs that anthropologists did not like Boaz refutes that “ culture” is something that a group can have more or less of EB Tyler saw culture as a result of human success that some people had more or less of Malinowski trained E.E Evans­ Pritchard and Max Gluckman Malinowski insisted we try to view natives from their perspective Manifest function • To provide men and women with sound education Latent Function • To provide men and women with an opportunity to socially engage others • Might not be  conscious factors in the decision making process of student or their  parents but universities BRITISH SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGISTS  structural­functional theory • STRUCTURAL FUNCTIONALISTS or FUNCTIONALISTS use the idea of  SOCIAL STRUCTURE to describe patterns of relations between individuals and  groups and tended to explain those PATTERNS in terms of their FUNCTIONS. • A position that explores how particular social forms function from day­to­day in  order to reproduce their traditional structures. • In contrast to the evolutionists, social anthropologists began to question why  things remain the same (rather than why they change) • Early 20  century structural functionalists produced a series of non­evolutionary  classifications of human social forms. • Emphasis on social stability tends to downplay or ignore questions (and evidence)  of change • They saw social institutions as self­perpetuating in a state of 'homeostatic  equilibrium', a state in which all the parts acted to keep the whole in balance. Evans Pritchard Evans­Pritchard saw functions as being about the perpetuation of social institutions He saw social institutions as self­perpetutating The Social Functions of Withcraft: Evans Pritchard and the Azande • Evans­Pritchard's account of Zande witchcraft is framed in terms of structural­ functional explanations.  • He shows how accusations follow lines of tension, which in turn relate to Azande  social institutions.  – E.g. although a prince may be suspected of witchcraft, he will never  actually be accused by a commoner.  – E.g. a woman must ask her husband, or more occasionally a male relative,  to consult oracles on her behalf. Not surprisingly therefore, Evans­ Pritchard never came across a case in which a woman accused her  husband of witchcraft. Men, on the other hand, frequently put the names  of their wives before the oracles as suspected witches.  • In bringing tensions into the open and dealing with them publicly, Evans­ Pritchard saw witchcraft as an institution as a kind of safety valve, facilitating the  smooth functioning of society and supporting the st
More Less

Related notes for Anthropology 1034

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit