Class Notes (834,244)
Canada (508,434)
History (17)
1100 (17)
Lecture

Making of the Modern World January 13, 15, 20.docx

10 Pages
124 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
1100
Professor
Valerie Hebert
Semester
Fall

Description
Hist 1100: Making of the Modern World January 13 , 2013 The Industrial Revolution Key Terms • Proletariat • Watt’s Steam Engine­ 1769 • Cottage Industry • Spinning Jenny, Water Frame • Locomotion • Factory Life • Social Impact of the Industrial Revolution ( urbanization, slums, child labour) • Factory Act, 1833 • Edwin Chadwick, “ Report on the Conditions of the Labouring Population of  Great Britain” 1842 • Trade Unions • Chartist Movement: Chartism • Luddites; Luddism • De­skilling Review of Napoleonic Era • Key historical debate: was he an heir to the French revolution or more of a traitor  to the movement? • The changes that the FR brought were what allowed a person such as Napoleon to  come to power o He came from a poor family and worked his way up through the military • From his military position he helped stabilize the FR • Unified a single body of laws for all of France • Napoleonic Code o Abolished serfdom o All people are equal • Many successful battles • Brought many FR­like changes to the battles he won • Created a noble class based on military class • One aristocracy was replaced with another • Enforced military conscription • Made himself Emperor of France, placed his own crown • Suppressed the freedom of the press • Fought wars all over the continental Europe • British were the one power he could not completely destroy • Napoleonic era may have been one of those moments that derailed the progression  of Germany and set it on a path to Hitler, and Nazi Germany • 1812, Napoleon had a long string of histories, and he decided he would invade  Russia • June 18212 he led an army of 600,000 men “ the Great Army” • 2/3 of the invasion force were non­french conscripts o swiss, dutch, Austrians, Prussians • successful until the reached Moscow on September 16 th • city was deserted and aflame • the emperor had order the evacuation of the city and to leave nothing behind for  the French “ Evacuation and Burning of Moscow” • Stayed in the city for 5 weeks then Napoleon decided to go back to France • Retreat from Moscow, the army began to return to the West • Many starved or died of disease • One of the greatest military debacles of any age • 600,000 went to the Russia, only 30,000 returned • Opposing powers decided to sign an allicance, Austria, Prussia,  • 1814 Allies were in Paris and Napoleon had been exiled • Urban legend: Bistro. Comes from the Russian Bystro which means hurry • France had to submit to the Ally’s decision to restore France to a monarch, which  was Louis the 18 th • Louis lacked the charisma of Napoleon • Napoleon escaped Elba • Chaotic 100 days then Napoleon suffered his last lost at Waterloo at 1815 • Died at St. Helena in 1821 • Louis returned to the thrown and went bac andforth between monarchs with less  or more power • France never again recaptured the power and prestige of the Napoleonic era The Industrial Revolution • Roughly the same time as the Frnech Revoltuojn • Revolutionary era • Change happening in every era • FR changed the political structure • IR changed the economic and social structures of Europe • No specific start • Evolved over a longer period of time 1760 – 1830 • Pre­ industrial production: windmills, water wheels • Introduction of engines, coal burning steam engines brought about factories • People moved to the cities for work • Industrial economy began the middle working class • Although the IR was a change in production, it also changed society Britain: Birthaplce of the Industrial Revolution • Began in Britain around 1760 • In 100 years it made Great Brtitain the wealthiest country in the world • Birtain was uniquely situated • By the end of the 1700s Britain was making 2.5 times more than France acre for  acre • With more money from selling the surplus, people couild invest in non­essential  things • There was a surplus of labourers • Britain already has a tradition of agricultural labour that moved from land to land • These were people who could lsip easier into these new jobs emerging • The Britain had more access to thigs at home like Iron and coal they produced ½  of the worlds coal, mostly from Whales • Basic building block for industrial expansion is coal • Had a vast colonial empire to draw raw material; cotton from India • Infrastructure in better shape: roads, waterways, on the coast • There is no point on the British isles that is farther than 15 miles from the coast • Birtina also had an advanced and stable financial structure • In the 1750s Britain was already enjoying the pleasures of a refined parliament  system • By they 1760s GB was already an unsually progressive and modern state Steam Engine • James Watts • Scottish • Patented the steam engine in 1759 • Burn coal and the flame would heat water contained in a boiler, produces steam,  the steam pressure would move a shaft which was attached to a fly wheel which  could be attached to other gears • Built upon earlier designs of steam engines which were unefficient • First the steam engine was used to power pumps at coal mines o Allowed the mines to go deeper and get more coal • The steam engine revolutionized the way in which many things were produced • The textile industry: pre­industrial revolution most textiles were produced in  cottage industries ( people working in their home),  • Suppliers wouldgive the workers the raw materials, then buy back the finished  pieces at a modest price Technological advances in spinning threat • Spinning wheel, produced only one spindle of thread • Spinning Jenny, produced multiple spindles of threat, hand operated • Arkwright water frame, several hundred spindles • Looms that could be moved by water  • Larger the machines became the more space was needed for them, led to factories • Steam engines could be powered by coal, so the factories did not need to be  located near water so the industry exploded • 1760 Britain imported and processed 22 million pounds of cotton • by 1840, the figure jumped to 38 million pounds of cotton • Imapct of the development of the cotton industry affected everyone o People wore underpants • Beyond producing clothing the cotton industry and the steam engine depended on  a massive unmoveable source of power • It became necessary for employers to bring workers to the machine instead of the  machine to the worker • Workers had to come out of the cottages, the birth of the modern factory Evolution of Railroad Locomotive • Locomotive, was the steam engine on wheels • The railway led to a revolution in transportation • The locomotive was the ultimate symbol of progress • Trevithick, 1804,  travelled at 5miles/ hour and only held 70 people • George Steven, 1830, 16miles/ hour, ran between Liverpool and Manchester • Demand for coal and iron helped develop the industries further • The railroad created new jobs • Costing less to move something means you can charge less or it • Railroad provided new source of _______ when it corssed over bridges, through  mountains, over cliffs • Gave people a sense of power over nature Industrial Factory in Everyday Life • As the workplace shifted from the farm  ▯cottage  ▯artisan shop  ▯factory • Employers hired workers who did not own the means to create something • With the introduction of the factory paradigm there was an increased sense of  responsibility on the emplyoers • Employers would not let the machines stand idle • Workers worked regular hours, on shifts so that the machines could we used to  max efficiency • Beginning of the “ 9 ­5” job, more like 6 – 7 • Timed labour was a new phenomenon • Cottage Industry worked on their own time in sync with the farming season • Factory owners had to create a new system of time, accustom workers to work  unchanging hours • Employees had a set number of pieces they had to do • The repetitive and boring work in the factory caused owners to become stricter  Wedgewood • “ To make machines of the men who cannot err” • Employees fined for minor infractions; being late • Could be fired for more serious infractions; drunkenness • Child workers often beaten • Being late 2 minutes lose half an hour of pay • Workers 3 minutes late cannot start until the first break and lose the pay • A worker cannot leave his/her place • Religious institutions went on the say that the suffer in this life would mean  pleasure in heaven • The impulse to improve workers lives would not come from churches, it would  come from the workers themselves Social Impact of the Industrial Revolution • One of the earliest consequences of the IR was the explosion of cities • Devil’s Acre, a famous London slum • Urban population ecploded • Conditions proved horrendous as worker slums formed in the middle of towns • The term “slum” come from the Irish word/phrase Slome, meaning a bleak or  disastrous place • Devil’s Acre o La
More Less

Related notes for 1100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit