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ANTH 1131 (98)

Class Notes for ANTH 1131 at Langara College

Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Human Origins

ANTH 1131 Lecture 16: Concept of "Race"
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Concept of Race * Refers to subspecies physically distinguishable population win a species. Ex: European reindeer and North American Caribou belong to same species but no contact with each other. Human Classification: Ba...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture Notes - Lecture 15: Vasodilation, Ice Age, Vasoconstriction
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Modern Human Variation Adaptation Continued. ... SpeciesWide Adaptation to Heat: Human cool themselves by sweating. Reduced body hair in humans make it more efficient for sweat evaporation. Vasodilation = small blood v...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture Notes - Lecture 14: Melanin, Eugenius Warming, Dark Skin
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Modern Human Variation Adaptation: Looks at physical differences: 1. Differences in Skin Color: As you move in lighter altitude, skin color gets lighter. Melanin = granular substance; the more melanin the darker your sk...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture Notes - Lecture 13: Anatomically Modern Human, Archaic Humans, Mitochondrial Eve
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Theoretical Models for the Origin of Anatomically Modern Humans Continued. ..: Recent out of Africa Model: 2. Recent out of Africa Model * Argues that anatomically modern humans beings evolved from archaic humans in a sing...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture 12: Theoretical Models for the Origin of Anatomically Modern Humans
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Theoretical Models for the Origin of Anatomically Modern Humans: 1. Multiregional Model 2. Recent out of Africa Model a). Complete Replacement Model b). Partial Replacement or Assimilation Model 1. Multiregional Model * Fr...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture Notes - Lecture 11: Major Trauma, Grave Goods, Mousterian
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Hominid Evolution: Homo Sapiens: 1. Homo Sapiens: Archaic Homo sapiens: * Large brain size; larger neurocranium; thinner cranial bones; heavily bust built; * Taller w a more vertical forehead => suggest the development of...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture Notes - Lecture 10: Oldowan, Zhoukoudian, Acheulean
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Hominid Evolution: Homo Erectus: * Acheulean Tools = Handaxes. * Homo Erectus fossil in Europe: Multipurpose tools. Oldowan Tradition tools. Omanisi Georgia = an early migration in Africa (fossil found in smaller than H...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture Notes - Lecture 9: Homo Habilis, Stone Tool, Oldowan
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Hominid Evolution: 1. Homo Habilis 2. Homo Erectus 3. Homo Sapiens a). Archaic Homo Sapiens b). Neanderthals c). Anatomically Homo sapiens 1. Hominid Evolution: Homo Habilis: * First made use stone tools (first hominid th...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture Notes - Lecture 8: Canine Tooth, Ardipithecus, Orrorin
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Human Origin: 1. Sahelanthropus tchandensis (6mya) Evidence of bipedalism unclear. No leg or foot has been found but the position of the magnum does appear to be in a relatively forward position of the base of the skull ...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture Notes - Lecture 7: Gluteus Medius Muscle, Bipedalism, Brain Size
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Hominids Characteristics: 1. Bipedalism 2. Dentition 3. Large Brain Size 4. Use I Make Tools * Bipedalism = Walking upright; bipedalism in humans is habitual (humans walk bipedal regardless of terrain). Bipedalism in huma...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture Notes - Lecture 6: Oligocene, Simian, Adapidae
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Primate Evolution: * Earliest primates originated in Laurasia during the Paleocene (more typical environment during this time). * First primate is believed to have evolved from Plesiadapiformes. 1. Prosimians (55mya) => Eo...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture Notes - Lecture 5: Dual Inheritance Theory, Plants And Animals, Primatology

Areas in the study of Physical Anthropology: 1. Evolution 2. Primatology (How we evolved) 3. Paleoanthropology (Human evolution) 4. Modern Human Variation Adaptation * Paleoanthropology study of physical development of s...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture 4: Primates

Primates: * Primates Social Structure: 1. Solidarity or single female her offspring (ex. Orangutan); Males are mostly alone. 2. Monogamous family group (ie. A single mate, a single female their offspring). Ex. Gibbons ...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture Notes - Lecture 3: Primatology, Color Vision, Prehensility

Primatology study of nonhuman primates * Characteristics of Primates: 1). Locomotion and Limbs: Flexible limb structure (primates can easily move around); prehensility (grasping ability in hands and feet). 2). Diet and De...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill
ANTH 1131 Lecture Notes - Lecture 2: Georges Cuvier, Robert Hooke, Carl Linnaeus

Fundamental Theories and Approaches in Physical Anthropology 1). Early history of the development of Evolutionary Theory: * Early perspective on the age of Earth: James calculated the world was created in 4004 BC from loo...

Anthropology
ANTH 1131
cassandrabill

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