Class Notes (837,346)
Canada (510,232)
ATOC 184 (67)
Lecture 6

ATOC 184 – Lecture 6.docx

11 Pages
207 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences
Course
ATOC 184
Professor
Eyad Atallah
Semester
Winter

Description
ATOC 184 – Lecture 6 January 23, 2014 Weather Maps ▯ ynthesis of all the types of observations ­ Two types: (1) surface maps tell us WHAT is happening (used on tv, etc. tells us  about the current weather), (2) other maps (other levels in the atmosphere), tell us  a lot about WHY it is happening ­ Winter: high pressure systems are generally associated with low temperatures and  low pressure with warmer temps ­ Also generally speaking, high temp = high dew point (aka more moisture in the  air) – exception to this is deserts *Already went over this but keep in mind how to “decode” this **Weather maps will never be in K, always in C or F ­ Blue symbol = cold front  ▯cold air displacing the warm air (cold front “taking  over”; if cold front comes through, you’d expect the temp to go down after it  passes) ­ Red = warm front  ▯warm air displacing the cold air ­ These fronts denote the boundaries between warm air masses and cold onesc ­ Isobars “connect the dots” between different areas with the same pressure ­ Important because the way the pressure field looks tell us about wind… stronger  the differences in pressure = stronger the wind ­ Also the shape of the isobars tell us which way the wind is blowing ­ In general, seems that pressures are higher to the south west, lower to the north  east (Drawing the isobars on a pressure map) ­ From this we can see the winds are blowing down from the north or north/west ­ You can tell if you have a lower or high pressure system either from pressure  maps or from the direction of the wind ­ The direction the wind blows based on pressure systems is based on 2 things:  wind trying to blow from high pressure to low pressure, and the rotation of the  earth (as the wind tries to blow from H to L, the rotation deflects it to the right) ­ The strength of the wind is determined by how close together the isobars are…  closer together = stronger wind ­ When we draw in the wind, it starts to make sense… where the temps are  warmest, the winds are coming up from the south and curling around the L  pressure systems. Where temps are coldest, winds coming down from the north ­ *Saturday is supposed to be warm because a L pressure system is coming in,  bringing with it winds from the south ­ Just by looking at the wind field (top) was able to tell where the low pressure  system was… winds curling counter clockwise ­ Can tell from the temp map too  ▯in general, temps go up on the eastern side of the   L pressure system and go down on the western side Upper­Air Maps ­ Thickness of atmosphere related to temp, aka when you warm up atmosphere it  takes up more volume and vise versa ­ Flat surface (top box) means temperature is not changing – flat pressure surface ­ Bottom box: temperature gradient added, hotter to the left and colder to the right.  Air is thicker where it’s hot, so it takes up more space (left side = goes up to  3200m). Right side, cold air takes up less room, so only goes up to 2800m ­ Left side: when you are below the band of 700mb, the press
More Less

Related notes for ATOC 184

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit