Class Notes (838,058)
Canada (510,633)
Biology (Sci) (2,472)
BIOL 305 (43)
Lecture

Jan 31-Mollusca pt2.docx

4 Pages
57 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology (Sci)
Course
BIOL 305
Professor
Virginie Millien
Semester
Winter

Description
31/01/14 Mollusca pt. 2 Aplacophora: Meaning “without plates” ­ All 300 species are marine (deep sea) ­ Worm­like morphology suggests burrowing in sediments ­ Have no shell, but numerous calcareous spines or scales o Could have evolved prior to the appearance of molluscan shell or may  have lost it ­ Though no head present, radula is present (molluscan feature) ­ Two groups: o Solengogastres:  Have pedal groove rather than foot: may either be a precursor or a  remnant of a foot  Calcareous spines in its epidermis o Caudofoveata: Buried in sediment in the deep­sea  Have a pair of gills, despite being buried  No foot or pedal groove Monoplacophora: Meaning “bearing a single plate” ­ Looks like a limpet dorsally ­ Though to have been extinct 350 mya and pre­1950s, there was little to no  mention of them in the literature ­ 1952: specimen discovered in dredgings off Costa Rica o Deep water is more stable ­ Mouth and food look a bit like a chiton and has radula ­ Serially paired arrangement of organs is reminiscent of segmentation (like what  you’d see in annelids) o Does this reflect some linkage to annelids and molluscs? Polyplacophora: Aka Chitons, Meaning “bearing many plates” – plates are reticulated ­ 1000 species are all marine ­ found in the intertidal or are benthic herbivores: attached to rocks and large algal  fronds that they graze on using their radula ­ Foot is used in attachment: o Girdle is the extension of the mentle and forms a suction cup to make a  tight seal to prevent dislocation and dislocation from the substrate o Gills are found all around the foot Scaphopoda: Means “shovel foot”, Aka tusk shells ­ Marine and sub­tidal, burrowers into sediment ­ Shell is open at both ends so that water goes through o Fat open end is stuck in the sediment and small end is exposed to the  water o They use the entire mantle tissue lining the shell for gas exchange (no  gills) 31/01/14 o Along the integument, cilia beat in concert to move water in and through  the shell ­ Foot is developed for digging w/ decreased cephalization o No eyes, but possess statocysts to tell what is up and down ­ Deposit feeder: feed on organic material that has sedimented  o As opposed to suspension feeders that remove food particles from the  water column (actively capturing or passively by water currents) w/  tentacles bring in particles towards the mouth Bivalvia: ­ 7000 species: Second biggest class (after gastropods) ­ Laterally compressed: ancestral adaptation for living in sediments ­ 2 valves usually equal in size (though not for the oyster) ­ Most are suspension feeders o Though some are deposit feeders o some are deposit feeders as juveniles then become suspension feeders as  they grown up and emerge from the sediment ­ Siphons are to direct water to the gills, for respiration and feeding and even  reproduction sometimes ­ Have big muscularture, gills and foot o Labial palps used to sort particles on the gills ­ Shell o Mantle tissue excretes the shell o Muscle scars on the shell show where muscles used to be attached  Pallial line: where the mantle adhered to the shell  Pallial sinus where mantle turned to siphon  The bigger the shell the bigger/stronger the muscles have to be to  open/close it ­ Eg. Actica islandica: Ocean Quahog o Longest­living animal documented ­ Eg. Marine mussels (Mytilus): adapted for substrate attachment, rather than  burrowing o Flat base and sideways opening allows them to open shells without  become detached 
More Less

Related notes for BIOL 305

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit