Class Notes (835,600)
Canada (509,275)
Biology (Sci) (2,472)
BIOL 305 (43)
Lecture

Apr 9-Hominoidea.docx

3 Pages
42 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology (Sci)
Course
BIOL 305
Professor
Virginie Millien
Semester
Winter

Description
Hominoidea Homonoids obviously come from primates. Tarsier: ­ Is a “basal” primate ­ They can leap up to 40 feet and catch insects in flight ­ Each tarsiers’ eye ball is as big as its brain Primates are hugely vision oriented Most primates are colour blind and do well in nocturnal environments Most primates have great arboreal anatomy: this includes traits like reversible ankles,  grasping hands and feet, and highly mobile joints (eg. shoulders and wrists) Clade homonoidea includes only Gibbons and Great Apes Gibbons:  ­ first break away from a normal looking arboreal primates ­ all previous primates are quadrepedal with elongate curved backs, laterally placed  shoulder blades with shoulder joints facing ventrally, prehensile toes and thumbs,  and fore and hind limbs that are about the same length (as is the case in most  quadrepedal mammals ­ Gibbons have lost their tail and quadrepedality and have brachiated limbs o They evolved long forelimbs and smaller legs. This dissociation of leg an  arm legs it very important in the diversification of homonoidea Great apes: Orangutans: ­ Strictly arboreal ­ Highly brachiated limbs Gorillini: ­ Slightly arboreal, though mainly terrestrial ­ More social than most early primates o Family behaviours o Rank order systems o Extensive parental care because newborns are friggin useless  This is because they have prioritized brain development so the  limbs and body are very poorly developed at birth  The head can’t fit out the vagina if the brain develops fully in the  womb, so the baby is poorly cognitively developed as well  Great apes have invested to much in large brain size that the body  and the brain take a very long time to develop ­ Use tools Pan (chimpanzees): ­ Complex ocial structures o Warring tribes,  slaves­like, docile ­ Tool use: stick and rocks as well as modified rocks (flaked rocks) As we move up the phylogeny, is a general trend towards tool use and less arboreal in  lifestyle Upward walk: evidence for this is in straight up and down spinal cord attachment directly  under the skull Sahalenthropis seemed to have a completely modern neck Ardipithecus: has a chimera of features ­ Has almost gorilla­like proportions, but it seems to have an upright posture ­ Elongated toes that would be good for tree walking, but its hips, knees, and ankles  restrict it to upright walking ­ Skulls  achieve human­like proportion: reduced snout and slightly enlarged brain­ sized ­ Hands look suited for knuckle walking, it has rotary wrist joints and high shoulder  mobility with a grasping hand ­ Toes on feet and hip structure could probably allow them to stand on one foot Australopithecus: ­ Aka, Lucy ­ upright posture ­ larger brain (475cc) ­ tibia has a deep crest that locks into a receiving crest in the femur and allows for a  stable knee joint and a fully vagal stance ­ Dentition is very similar to modern humans Paranthropus: ­ an
More Less

Related notes for BIOL 305

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit