Class Notes (836,277)
Canada (509,737)
Biology (Sci) (2,472)
BIOL 305 (43)
Lecture

Feb 14-Hexapoda.docx

4 Pages
77 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology (Sci)
Course
BIOL 305
Professor
Virginie Millien
Semester
Winter

Description
Arthropods 1 000 000 species described 200 000 000 insects for everyone one person Largest group Features: ­ Paired/jointed appendages, specialized body regions, cephalization, chitin  exoskeleton ­ Active fight: aids in escaping predators, dispersal, moving to new locations,  recolonizing disturbed environment more quickly or leaving before it is too late ­ Exoskeleton: For protection, muscle attachment, preventing desiccation o Deep sea is great for certain in vertebrates, but terrestrial life is very  different and the exoskeleton is a good adaptation o Must go through ecdysis (moulting)  Eg. Dragonfly: It can take hours for them to moult and dry their  wings (most vulnerable at this time). Mass emergence helps,  because then predators can’t eat them all. Nymphs are limited to  shallow water because they wouldn’t have access to emergence or  have access to air (breathe with tracheae) ­ Reduced coelom: The don’t need a hydrostatic skeleton because they have an  exoskeleton ­ Respiration through trachea: though most aquatic larval stages have gill plates  (adults have tracheae) Superficially similar to annelids (segmentation, appendages, ventral nerve chord) ­ Articulata hypothesis o Common ancestor between annelids and arthropods  See similarities betwee polycheates and centipedes (lack of  tagmosis) o Onocophorons as a sister group ­ Hexapods and crustaceans are very closely related = pancrustacea Marella spendens: First arthropod? ­ Found by Wallcott ­ Cost common arthropod in Burgess Shale (Middle Cambrian) ­ More recently a fossil showed its moulting Hexapoda: Collembola: Spring tails ­ Don’t fly, but they can get away from things using a springing mechanism to let  them jump ­ No distinct larval stage Lepidoptera: Moths/Butterflies ­ Well defined larval stages ­ Almost all caterpillars are herbivorous o Though one carnivorous caterpillar found in Hawaii:  Live in close proximity:  Spins silk (like all lepidopteran larvae) and traps the tree snail that  don’t have operculum ­ Adults feed on not much, but if they do they eat nectar ­ Most endangered arthropod group o Most abundant in tropical forests (habitat loss), and there’s an illegal trade  for them (harvesting) Hemiptera: “half­wing” True bugs ­ Needle­like proboscis mouth parts o Can be agricultural crop pests o Water bug that can attack fish o Can have important economic/ecological role (eg. eating caterpillars) Coeloptera: Beetles ­ Most diversity within the hexapods (800 000 species) ­ radiation of insects is related to the radiation of angiosperms o resource as food and as habitat is a major driver of insect radiation Diptera: “two wing” True flies ­ Next biggest diversity after beetles ­ Eg. o Midges: closely relate to mosquitoes, but don’t take blood meals o Crane­fly: Larvae in aquatic habitats o Mosquitoes: important disease vectors Hymenoptera: bees, wasps, ants ­ Important plant pollinators ­ Have developed coloniality and amaz
More Less

Related notes for BIOL 305

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit