Class Notes (836,274)
Canada (509,725)
ECON 302 (17)
Tom Velk (17)
Lecture

Lecture Notes

4 Pages
123 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics (Arts)
Course
ECON 302
Professor
Tom Velk
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 18 11/05/2013 Read ch. 1­3 (including ch.3 Appendix) and ch.10 & Glossary of Green Book (Helicopter level) Green Book • Written by ‘group of 22’ (finance ministers of 22 major countries) • Banks are no longer principles, rather ‘brokers’ – they don’t take the money onto their own books to  lend, rather they find money and find people who are seeking investors and then to make the funds  available to the ‘borrowers’ • The banker makes revenue by charging fees to all the involved parties • Group of 22 was so interested in this shift towards brokerage banking because it created a  whole new set of risks (talked about last class) • The suggested strategy was for the central bank to say, via aggressive regulation, to the  commercial banks: you should do business in the following way… o Always aimed at preserving/protecting bank capital (net worth)…2 great errors were  made by the Basel group in the design of Basel I II and III (3 successive waves) Basel I • Suggested banks should have 3 layers of borrowers and they should keep a certain level of net worth  against each of the three tiers • Great mistake here – supposedly, the best borrowers were governments (particularly crazy), therefore  didn’t need to keep any net worth when you make lots of loans to the government • You needed to keep more reserves (in the form of net worth) for more private borrowers (there were a  couple layers of private borrowers), when in fact they were probably the best borrowers  • These proposed regulations had no force of law – they were simply suggestions by BIS, but they have  a great reputation so their suggestions have been taken up by central bankers and turned into law by  various congressional/parliamentary bodies around the world (Getting off of helicopter level) Changing the Nature of Money Itself • If we think of money as the product of banking, we think that money itself has changed itself in a  profound way, mainly because of its internationalization  • Because of the brokers themselves have come into being, internationalization of the financial market • Both money + financial institutions have evolved together and the reason that the change in the  institution is associated with the changing nature of money is ‘portfolio­balance money’ •  ortfolio­balance mone : an approach that bankers can take • Imaginary monetary institution (almost exists, but not at this level): imagine we have just one  giant bank that we’re all customers of and what it does is it holds our financial wealth, each and  every one of us has a portfolio and we have investments in stocks, we own a house, we own  some mortgages, it’s our whole balance sheet, just happens to be managed for us. Think of  this banker as a trustee – they manage our debts, hold both the assets and liability sides of our  balance sheet. We people associated with this super­broker, one of us is HBC and one is me  the customer. So if you walk down to the store because you want to buy a new pair of pants,  there’s a price tag, the pants are $100. You say ok, you're going to buy it. You give them your  debit card, they give your pants, and in the background what happens is $100 worth of your  most mobile/liquid asset gets transferred off my balance sheet, I acquire a pair of pants (lose  an asset, gain an asset), on the books of HBC, a pair of pants goes off their balance sheet and  they gain another asset of $100. Our one super­bank just changes ownership in some shares  of some company, say RIM or APPLE or something else if there’s a third party involved. • Money has changed in this fundamental way partly because of these brokerage changes and partly  because of technology • Money’s functions have become divisible (this idea will become important when we talk about the  change in banking too) • There’s a great axiom in microeconomics – if an asset is divisible into pieces, you should always divide  it into as many pieces of possible (ex: if you bought a new car, it would make no sense to require you  purchase your gasoline at the car dealership; divide the obligation from buying gasoline and buying the  car…same idea with borrowing money, you w
More Less

Related notes for ECON 302

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit