Class Notes (837,539)
Canada (510,303)
ECON 302 (17)
Tom Velk (17)
Lecture

Lecture Notes

3 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics (Arts)
Course
ECON 302
Professor
Tom Velk
Semester
Fall

Description
STUDY THE PRODUCTS AND KNOW DEFINITIONS FOR FINAL • Last class looked at 4 impacts on monetary policy • One of the big things that is happening with policy is internationalization of the money market,  diminishment of national borders to money flows and diminishment of the importance of  national money – so money can flow readily and in huge amounts across borders  • Nature of single moneys is also being diminished; certain firms will operate in baskets of  currencies (in many nations), and in that sense they more or less automatically find themselves  working with a basket of currency • No single central bank is able to address/manage this kind of currency risk, it needs to be  managed (if at all) by central banks operating together. During the 2008 financial crisis, the Fed  organized a kind of cartel of central banks that tried to address this basket of currencies issue  (unsuccessfully) • International exchange rates are much more important now than they were before  • Interest rates converge because of the free­flow of funds • Some central banks try to manage the exchange rates – ex: Czechs tried to weaken their  currency, they could affect their exchange rate  • Deregulation factor   • Prof talked about re­regulation, in the US vs. CAN and Germany where we have had virtually  no redrawing of legislation, ex: Dodd­Frank has so far been a failure and does not seem to  have assisted very much in recovery whereas in CAN, we’re in much better shape which is  especially impressive because Canada has behaved very prudently and moderately relative to  US • Especially in relation to Dodd­Frank, there has been a whole new kind of lobbying entity made  up of several braniacs (former staffers of banking and currency committee) who put together  Dodd­Frank and they do nothing but counsel with bankers regarding this complex piece of  legislation (lobbyists have always done this but this group is unusual in that it ONLY deals with  this) • All this makes devising monetary policy much more complicated and harder to understand than  it ever was in the past • Information isn’t something you can acquire just by reading regulations anymore, actually need  to speak to experts to understand what it really means Four Major New Instruments • They were new in 1986, not really new anymore. Not necessarily the story of all the instruments  that are out there. This is a taste of new products • New world of finance has created a whole bunch of risks, which can be dealt with through  products (hedging, insurance, etc.) • Some hedging + insurance products extinguish risk (ex: life insurance, by compiling actuarial  tables, they’ll know statistically exactly how many people aged 75­85 will die in any one year  and so know exactly how much they need to have in liquid reserves to pay this off. Therefore  they need take no risks) • There are some risks that you cannot cancel, you can only shift • Understand that the products are ways to either shift risk (sell it), the product in this kind of  situation searches out the players in the financial community who are most willing to bear a  certain kind of risk – that is, that they will charge the least to absorb the risk. The problem with  this shift is that it does tend to concentrate on a small number of players, all with risks of type  ‘x’, for example.  • (1) Note­Issuance Facilities • Revolving facility, enables borrower to issue a stream of short­term notes over a  medium­term period • Addresses the problem that borrowers began to need huge amounts of money that  were risk­creating for any one bank, and of course the banks more and more were  moving into this brokerage strategy and not making very large single loans. What  happened in the early days of this brokerage invention was a kind of cartelization of  lending, groups of banks got together to make large loans (often to governments or  large firms or at least particular industries). This strategy of making loans by means of  an organization (called syndicated loans) began to weaken/fail because syndicates  were hard to keep together in the medium term (3­5 years) and the syndicated loans  tended to lock the borrower into fixed rates and the syndicates were difficult to  manage, needed a kind of lead­bank • Syndicated loans generally expensive, inefficient • Now, a bank/group of banks will simply be a broker t
More Less

Related notes for ECON 302

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit