Class Notes (838,386)
Canada (510,872)
ECON 302 (17)
Tom Velk (17)
Lecture

Lecture Notes

5 Pages
101 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics (Arts)
Course
ECON 302
Professor
Tom Velk
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 16 10/29/2013 Green Book & Beginning of Basel Revolution (Intro) • Not the liquidity but the capital adequacy of the banking system is what needs to be regulated because  these brokers have to essentially remain in business/survive various shocks Exposed to shocks because the brokerage operation is not pure (and has not been from the  • beginning) o Pure?  Pure broker would just bring buyer and seller together and then walk away  Brokers take on all kinds of risks in the process of bringing buyers and sellers  together, one of the most fundamental problems is that that promise  investment opportunities to the people with money and capital  adequacy/infusion to the people looking for money when in fact the broker  cannot really perform in the sense of providing this investment opportunity to  the saver (may be unable to deliver on this promise) • The whole focus of the Green book is the design of a whole series of regulatory strategies which  eventually get adopted all around the world given its persuasive status (Basel rules) – like a suggestion  from the mafia • Idea that you could define something that you could call ‘bank capital’ (means net worth,  assets – liabilities) – problem being that assets have a value determined by the market, so the  greatest need for a big net worth is when the market is in big trouble. But when this is the case,  the asset side of the balance sheet disappears (shrinking assets, growing liabilities,  disappearing capital) • Net worth is created or destroyed almost instantaneously  • Dodd­Frank had the idea that capital stands outside the world of risk and uncertainty o Idea was that bank capital could be independently protected against the  business/crisis cycle Goofy idea in Basel I and II was that the best way to guarantee that banks would have good capital  • would be to control the kinds of lending that could be done • Especially in Basel I the idea was promoted by BIS was that the best loans were the ones  made to government…prof says not true • “No special capital has to be held against loans to government” “more capital required to make loans to  private borrowers”  ▯ some of the Basel rules • Prof’s opinion: the terrible excess borrowing that governments do date from Basel I, II and III  when banks were encouraged to lend to/promote government borrowing • Interesting that there’s this ‘coincidence’ of time of European government debt  CAP M Model • Suggests that there is a one security solution (in other words, remember the drawing of possible  investments which combine to create the market portfolio combined with utility contour…the weird  shaped bubble from last class ) Risks • Regulatory risks (raid on JP Morgan – new rules being applied to them that didn’t exist when they made  the loans) • Tax risks – unexpected changes will affect typically only a subset of involved players in a certain type of  international family of agreements (becoming more common as bankers today pay less and less regard  to national or currency borders) • Political risks – in the political risk world, the politicians who have made various kinds of promises (ex:  free housing) is that they offload the consequences of their promises on the banking system • Variance/standard deviation­type risks – common to all loans • Black swan risk – highly unlikely events occurring • Another type of Black Swan risks is that there are constantly new things evolving (ex: idea that  everyone would have a computer in their telephone was unheard of…there is no way for a  lender to know in a normal curve of error sense of knowing certain things because there is no  data history)  o Especially because in the beginning, all firms appear to have promising early history  but we never know when it’s going to end • Currency risk – foreign exchange risk and availability (means that the underlying firms lending or  borrowing may be safe/secure but for some reason the foreign exchange wall separating them from the  other people in the deal presents a problem, could be a political or speculative issue) • Counterparty performance risk – you get one side of an ongoing relationship (ex: a swap) where a  party to the deal, again, isn’t necessarily failing but they may be slow or may be suffering from special  information problems because they're locked away inside some particular government, they may be  subject to one of these political/regulatory problems which could slow/delay/impede performance in  some way • We use the term counterparty because for many of the products and services for the activities  we’re discussing, it doesn’t make sense to talk about buyers or sellers, rather you have some  kind of inflow of funds coming to you as a result of a particular instrument you're holding  • Sovereign or country risk – defined as saying the direct players and counterparties are not going to  default, are willing/able to perform their side of the deal but the nation in which they are located locks  up the markets or in other ways makes it difficult for counterparty performance to be completely up to  contractual levels • Credit risk – the players themselves are perfectly good players but they cannot get money (ex: Lehman  Brothers) • Reinvestment risk – what can be done with cash throw­offs, you may be involved in a good investment  MISSED THIS • Settlement risk – in ma
More Less

Related notes for ECON 302

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit