Class Notes (834,042)
Canada (508,292)
ECON 302 (17)
Tom Velk (17)
Lecture

Lecture Notes

6 Pages
117 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics (Arts)
Course
ECON 302
Professor
Tom Velk
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 7 09/24/2013 Helicopter View  • Law of one price: the price of a good traded internationally must be the same no matter what country  you buy/sell it, this is because if it is cheaper in one place everyone will go to that place where the oil is  cheapest and this phenomena will go on until either the cheaper oil becomes more expensive or the  expensive oil becomes cheaper • Advocates of floating/managed rates feel that somehow they can defeat the law of one price – the  model makes you think that a floating rate devaluating a currency will somehow stimulate exports and  there will be a de­stimulation for imports because the price of exported products in the eyes of  foreigners is supposed to be cheaper or because the price of imported commodities in the eyes of your  own people will be higher but of course this is a denial of the law of one price for traded commodities • If this were to happen, the critics of floating and managed rates will say that your exports which  started off a little cheaper, everyone will go there to your market and buy there until the price  goes back to the world level. UNLESS you have monopoly power over the commodity that  you're exporting in which case maybe you determine the price Dunn refers to this as the monetarist view of floating rates but this is a little confusing because  • Friedman was a monetarist  • Everything we’re doing now with Dunn is about getting one point on the AD curve, thinking back to the  schools briefs notes, remember what you do is develop an AD curve which has a slope in the price  dimension (vertical price, horizontal GNP income  ▯ axis labels), all we’re doing here is tricks to alter a  point on the AD curve and that point along with the other points interest eh family of points that make  up the AD curve may very well move/shift with respect to some international factors or other factors  we’ve been talking about by way of monetary/fiscal policy • But, there too you need to recognize that there are constraints in the model • One of most important is that the AS curve might be totally vertical (the level of income does  not vary with price) and it may be that what’s going on in the background if we pull ourselves  into an international exchange setting…if we’re Ecuador and our national income totally  depends on the price of bananas, recognize that these curves are oversimplifications and the  dominant factor at work in determining the level of national income might be totally outside the  variables being considered and totally outside the scope of fiscal, monetary or exchange rate  policies. So it could be that none of these policies are able to change anything if all the banana  plants are ruined for example, none of those policies will affect the quality of your banana crops • These models give the idea that you can do all these magical things, so keep this in mind Fixed vs. Floating Exchange Rates • Friedman and Dunn say that this kind of rate makes monetary policy possible, doesn’t like fiscal policy • In a fixed exchange rate world (what they don’t want), the monetary policy doesn’t work because of  specie flow • Specie flow: illustrated in diagram 1 – try to stimulate economy by shifting LM south­east, hope  is to move from lower level of income to a higher level of income with lower interest rates but  the curve shifts back. WHY? Because when you add money to small open trading economy,  your prices will begin to rise and therefore you are not a good place to buy things and not a  good place to buy things even in respect to your own people. Your own people will take their  money • A floating currency supposedly means that when you raise Q of money by moving LM south­east you  devalue your currency via inflation and therefore also IS and BOP shift to the right in a stimulative  direction (IS north east and BOP south east) and you get total stimulus shifting your equilibrium to a  higher income at about same interest rate (diagram 2) • Whether you get stimulation with devaluation depends on elasticity – inelastic demand for  exported goods (ex: Canada exporting energy to US), a lower value for CAD means that you  get less payment from Americans on aggregate for the energy they buy, so right now CAD is  higher than it used to be meaning that earnings that Canada is getting from commodity exports  to US and China have been very positive and it would therefore be unwise for Canada, given  that it is a commodity exporter and many of these commodities are inelastic, to go ahead trying  to depreciate rather than appreciate its currency. • Another problem with floating rates is that it creates an environment of instability, risk and needless cost • If exchange rate is varying all the time, and working in an industry that does a lot of importing  and exporting (ex: Wal­Mart in Canada, brings in a lot of stuff from other countries and then  sells it. Their margins in grocery business are small, like 1­2%), if currency bounced around like  3­5% this can make an unprofitable situation by way of planning. There are financial products  (options, futures, etc.) that you can have with suppliers to fix the price into the medium price  but it costs money to make these arrangements (brokers, foreign exchange market people),  these expenses would be unnecessary in a one­currency world or a gold­standard world. • The risks introduced about whether or not you can be sure to invest in a foreign country and  hten whether or not you want to take dividends home, etc. • The whole idea that currencies change in value may be nothing more than a warning light of  political or other types of instabilities within the nation. Iran, for instance, has recently lost half  the external value of it’s currency. If you were crazy enough to think about investing there, you  wouldn’t say “it’s a good thing that Iran has a floating currency because this makes it more  attractive to me, I’ll put my money there even though in the past year I would have lost half of it”  – among the considerations you make as a foreign investor would be the instability of your  earnings due to fluctuation of rates and also that the government might be in trouble or  opportunistic or manipulistic of foreign investors. Could be a signal to stay away rather than  invest. So if devaluation has a root to economic health, I think that there are many scenarios  where such practice on the part of government would drive money away and diminish  economic health, not enhance it. ** Macro will be on exam but it will be mechanical spit back, don’t need to worry about prof’s politics, read  the stuff in Dunn that’s in the boxes. Might have to do algebra on the exam ** WHAT DO CENTRAL BANKS DO? Utopian View of what Central Banks do • Central banks around the world have been sharing this belief that so long as we get interest rate low  enough and add enough liquidity, we can end the recession and bring about a rapid recovery • Central bank in US has added various measures, but by prof’s calculation, they have increased money  supply 300% (!!!) since 2008 and it has reduced the interest rate to levels that nobody has ever seen  before in statistical history (post­WW2), result has been an American recovery that has been the worst  in history. There are statistics since WW2, typically a real growth rate of almost Asian­levels, 4­6% per  annum (this is what Ragan achieved), average is in that neighborhood. The Obama recovery has been  less than 2% (about 1.5­1.7), there are now 25 million fewer people in US work force than at the end of  Bush’s term. Bush’s worst month for unemplo
More Less

Related notes for ECON 302

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit